MHA Monday Report Jan. 17, 2022

MHA Covid-19 update

Combating the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19): Week of Jan. 10

The state of Michigan held a press conference Jan. 11 to discuss the rapid rise in case numbers, hospitalizations (especially pediatric hospitalizations) and positivity rates. Speakers urged all residents who are eligible to be both vaccinated and boosted as quickly as possible. Representatives from Children’s Hospital of Michigan joined …


Virtual BreakthroughExplore Ways to Advance Health Equity, Workforce and Resilience at Breakthrough

MHA Breakthrough, which will be held in-person Feb. 17 and 18 at the Grand Traverse Resort and Spa near Traverse City, provides a venue for crucial conversations about the healthcare crisis and ways providers can lead recovery using information …


Application Closing Soon for ED Medication for Opioid Use Disorder Initiative

In partnership with the MHA Keystone Center, the Michigan Opioid Partnership and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan has launched an Emergency Department  Medication for Opioid Use Disorder …


Active Shooter and Workplace Violence Response Training Essential to Safety

The threat or use of physical force or harassment against a healthcare worker very often results in injury, psychological trauma or stress. Aggressive behavior and violence are becoming a too frequent reality, and healthcare employees need to understand the actions and behaviors needed to protect themselves …


PSOPatient Safety Organization Annual Meeting Will be Held March 9

The 2022 MHA Keystone Center Patient Safety Organization Annual Meeting will be held virtually from 9 a.m. to 3:10 p.m. March 9. Participants will hear about topics related to the intersection of health equity and safety, anticoagulation-related medication events, addressing violence in …


MHA CEO Brian Peters appears on Mid-Michigan NOW on Jan. 13, 2022.Headline Roundup: Week of Jan. 10 for COVID-19 in Michigan

The MHA has been actively fielding and responding to media requests related to the surge of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling on the vaccine mandate from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services …


The Keckley Report

Paul Keckley

The PE Playbook: What to Expect in 2022

“Private equity’s impact in healthcare delivery accelerated during the pandemic. Next year, it’s likely to continue with profound implications for traditional providers. The facts are these …”

Paul Keckley, Dec. 20, 2021


News to Know

  • The MHA will host a free webinar from 1 to 2 p.m. EST Jan. 25 to provide an update on price transparency and the No Surprises Act, including what is now required for compliance.
  • MHA offices will be closed and no formal meetings will be scheduled Jan. 17 in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

     


Application Closing Soon for ED Medication for Opioid Use Disorder Initiative

In partnership with the MHA Keystone Center, the Michigan Opioid Partnership and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan (CFSEM) has launched an Emergency Department (ED) Medication for Opioid Use Disorder Initiative and funding opportunity for Michigan hospitals. The initiative aims to increase access to evidence-based medication for opioid use disorder and support the transition to long-term, office-based treatment upon discharge. More information about the initiative is available in an online video.

The application opened Jan. 3 and will close Jan. 21. Applications submitted after Jan. 21 may be accepted on a rolling basis if grant funds remain. Grant funds are limited and are available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Eligibility will be determined by the number of encounters each hospital has annually to treat patients for opioid-related overdoses. Eligible hospitals are encouraged to coordinate and apply as a system. If two or more eligible hospitals from the same system are interested in applying, they are encouraged to contact the CFSEM to discuss the possibility of applying as a system. Eligibility for grant funding is outlined as follows:

  • Hospitals with more than 100 encounters annually are eligible for technical assistance and up to $150,000.
  • Hospitals with 50-100 encounters annually are eligible for technical assistance and up to $75,000.
  • Hospitals with fewer than 50 encounters annually are eligible for technical assistance and are strongly encouraged to contact the CFSEM if interested. Currently, hospitals with fewer than 50 encounters annually are ineligible for funding.

For the most current information, application instructions and grant guidelines, visit the CFSEM website. Members may contact the MHA Keystone Center with questions and email CFSEM to learn more or to request a meeting to discuss this opportunity.

MHA Monday Report Jan. 10, 2022

MHA Covid-19 update

Combating the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19): Weeks of Dec. 20, Dec. 27 and Jan. 3

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) COVID Data Tracker, the omicron variant of COVID-19 is now the dominant strain across the U.S. The CDC’s model indicates that more than 95% of cases in the nation as of Jan. 1 may be due to omicron. …


Governor Signs Bill to Codify Licensure Exemptionscapitol building

On Dec. 27, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer signed into law Senate Bill 759, which codifies a licensure exemption provision that has given hospitals regulatory flexibility to appropriately respond to the pandemic, specifically staffing challenges. …


Virtual BreakthroughPandemic and Workforce Challenges Topics at MHA Breakthrough

At the close of 2021, the COVID-19 pandemic situation confronting Michigan hospitals was dire. A prolonged fourth surge drove intensive care unit occupancy rates to nearly 90 percent. Additionally, significant workforce challenges that predated the pandemic became worse and the increasing rates of …


Webinar Will Help Boards Analyze Strategic Plan

Innovation in medicine and service delivery, new competitors, payer upheaval, renewed scrutiny on the social determinants of health, and more are creating instability. There is much work ahead for hospital and health system boards as organizations reassess their strategic plans, community …


Medicaid to Cover Dialysis Services for ESO Beneficiaries in Dialysis Facilities

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services recently released concurrent proposed and final policies to clarify Medicaid policy for the treatment of End Stage Renal Disease for beneficiaries covered under Medicaid Emergency Services Only. …


Virtual Events Focus on Active Shooter, Workplace Violence Prevention and Response

Aggressive behavior and violence are becoming a too frequent reality, whether it is expressed as violence against caregivers or gun violence in the community. The MHA is holding two virtual events to assist members with these challenges. …


WELL-B Program Starting March 1

Well-being Essentials for Learning Life-Balance is a behavioral health training program for the healthcare workforce that delivers weekly webinars on evidence-based well-being topics, including prevalence and severity of burnout, relationship resilience and being present. Compared to …


MHA CEO Brian Peters appears on CNN on Jan. 3, 2022.

Headline Roundup: Weeks of Dec. 20, Dec. 27 and Jan. 3 for COVID-19 in Michigan

The MHA has been actively fielding and responding to media requests related to the surge of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, the omicron variant and increasing rates of violence against healthcare workers. …


The Keckley Report

Paul Keckley

The No Surprise Act Means Plenty of Surprises

“Effective last Sunday, the No Surprises Act (NSA) passed by Congress in December 2020, became law. It protects consumers against surprise bills from out-of-network hospitals and physicians which apply to 10 million patient encounters including 1 in 5 emergency room visits and 1 in 6 in-network hospitalizations.”

Paul Keckley, Jan. 3, 2022


News to Know

Hospital staff are encouraged to participate in a national webinar hosted by DataGen to review the Medicare fee-for-service outpatient prospective payment system final rule and impact analysis for calendar year 2022.


WELL-B Program Starting March 1

Well-being Essentials for Learning Life-Balance (WELL-B) is a behavioral health training program for the healthcare workforce that delivers weekly webinars on evidence-based well-being topics, including prevalence and severity of burnout, relationship resilience and being present. Compared to anxiety and depression, burnout is relatively easier to treat and prevent.

This free webinar series is a collaboration between the MHA Keystone Center and the Duke Center for Healthcare Safety and Quality, led by Bryan Sexton, PhD. WELL-B delivers “bite-sized” virtual learnings to train clinical and nonclinical staff on how they can support their colleagues. The WELL-B webinar series has a planned start date of March 1 and runs for 10 consecutive weeks at noon EST. Attendees may receive up to 11 hours of continuing medical education credit or American Nurse Credential Center credit. Recordings will be available to view and share after each live session.

Additional information and enrollment are available online. Those who would like assistance enrolling or have questions should contact the MHA Keystone Center.

MHA Monday Report Dec. 20, 2021

MHA Covid-19 update

Combating the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19): Week of Dec. 13

A full year after COVID-19 vaccines were made available in the U.S., the coronavirus continues to sicken and kill people, with nationwide deaths from the illness surpassing 800,000. As demonstrated in a collection of headlines, Michigan’s hospitals are being stretched to treat COVID-19 patients across …


capitol buildingMichigan House Passes Healthcare Workforce Funding Bill

The Michigan House of Representatives passed Dec. 14 House Bill 5523, a $1 billion COVID-19 supplemental funding bill that includes $300 million for recruiting and retaining healthcare workers. The appropriation is a direct result of MHA advocacy efforts regarding the dire situation of hospitals confronting staff …


Bill to Codify Licensure Exemptions Awaits Governor’s Signature

The full House passed Senate Bill (SB) 759 Dec. 14 and it now awaits the governor’s signature. Introduced by Sen. Curt VanderWall (R-Ludington) and supported by the MHA, SB 759 would codify a provision that has given hospitals flexibility to appropriately respond to the pandemic; however, the …


Advocacy Continues to Defend Healthcare from Harmful Federal Policies

President Joe Biden Dec. 10 signed legislation to postpone several proposed cuts in Medicare rates recently approved by Congress. The MHA and the American Hospital Association had urged lawmakers to delay the cuts that would have taken effect Jan. 1 due to …


Virtual Breakthrough

Discuss Approaches to Pandemic, Workforce Challenges at MHA Breakthrough

In a recent video message, MHA CEO Brian Peters shared his thoughts about the MHA’s commitment to helping hospitals and health systems deal with the effects of the pandemic and the value of convening in person to study challenges, learn from


COVID-19 Impact on Strategic Planning Focus of Webinar

Hospital and health system boards will face challenges as the world transitions from a multiyear pandemic to confronting an endemic disease. The industry is experiencing instability and near-constant change: innovation in medicine and service delivery, new competitors, payer upheaval, renewed scrutiny on …


Two-part Webinar Will Review Challenging Accreditation Standards Jan. 13

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and other regulatory agencies are continually revising requirements that result in changes to The Joint Commission (TJC) standards. In addition, there are problematic areas that are commonly reviewed on TJC surveys that require additional education and …


MHA Creates COVID-19 Social Media Toolkit for Hospitals

As hospitals and health systems across Michigan continue communication efforts around COVID-19 and the importance of getting vaccinated this winter season, the MHA has developed a downloadable social media toolkit with posts and graphics for healthcare organizations to share across digital …


Recording Available of Event Outlining Collection of SOGI Data Best Practices

MHA members were among those who virtually attended the webinar Collection of Sexual Orientation Gender Identity Data Best Practices for the Acute Care Setting. The event was hosted Nov. 10 by the Michigan Public Health Institute, the Michigan State University Institute for Health Policy, the MHA …


Mental Health and Resilience for Health Care Workers During the HolidaysAbilitiCBT Logo

Mental health is central to everything. This is a definitive statement because it is so true. Mental health is central to our quality of life, relationships, work experience and even participation in the economy. Many people take it for granted, but if there is any benefit to the strain of the past twenty months, it is that it …


Trustee Insights Highlights Crisis Standards of Care, Community Investment

The latest edition of Trustee Insights, the monthly digital package from the American Hospital Association, is now available. This month’s issue features an article on crisis standards of care. In this severe pandemic, one of the most challenging demands that many hospitals may face is …


MHA SVP Adam Carlson speaks with WWMT-TV on SB 759

Headline Roundup: Week of Dec. 13 for COVID-19 in Michigan

The MHA has been actively fielding and responding to media requests related to the surge of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, and workforce sustainability challenges. …


The Keckley Report

Paul Keckley

Inflation and Healthcare: Prices Matter

“Medical care services- one of two components of the Medical Care Index in the United States- increased 2.1% for the 12 months ending November 2021, after rising 3.2% in 2020 and 5.1% in 2019 over the same time period …

“A one-month or one-year look-back period doesn’t tell the full story for healthcare.”

Paul Keckley, Dec. 13, 2021


Recording Available of Event Outlining Collection of SOGI Data Best Practices

MHA members were among those who virtually attended the webinar Collection of Sexual Orientation Gender Identity (SOGI) Data Best Practices for the Acute Care Setting. The event was hosted Nov. 10 by the Michigan Public Health Institute, the Michigan State University Institute for Health Policy, the MHA Keystone Center and Fenway Health. This training featured Chris Grasso, vice president, health informatics and data services, and Alex Keuroghlian, MD, director of the division of education and training at Fenway Health, who discussed best practices for collecting and documenting patient SOGI data in electronic health records. 

A recording of the webinar is available on the MHA Community site. Members with questions may contact the MHA Keystone Center.

Grants Available to Fund ED Medication for Opioid Use Disorder Initiative

In partnership with the MHA Keystone Center, Michigan Opioid Partnership and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan (CFSEM) has launched an Emergency Department (ED) Medication for Opioid Use Disorder Initiative and funding opportunity for Michigan hospitals. The initiative aims to increase access to evidence-based medication for opioid use disorder and support the transition to long-term, office-based treatment upon discharge. More information about the initiative is available in an online video.

The next application cycle will open Jan. 3 and close Jan. 21. Additional application cycles during the award period, which ends Sept. 30, will depend upon remaining funding. Grant funds are limited and are available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Eligibility will be determined by the number of encounters each hospital has annually to treat patients for opioid-related overdoses. Eligible hospitals are encouraged to coordinate and apply as a system. If two or more eligible hospitals from the same system are interested in applying, they are encouraged to contact the CFSEM to discuss the possibility of applying as a system. Eligibility for grant funding is outlined as follows:

  • Hospitals with more than 100 encounters annually are eligible for technical assistance and up to $150,000.
  • Hospitals with 50-100 encounters annually are eligible for technical assistance and up to $75,000.
  • Hospitals with fewer than 50 encounters annually are eligible for technical assistance and are strongly encouraged to contact the CFSEM if interested. Currently, hospitals with fewer than 50 encounters annually are ineligible for funding.

Application instructions and grant guidelines are available on the CFSEM website, and future application cycles will be posted there. Members may contact the MHA Keystone Center with questions and email CFSEM to learn more or to request a meeting to discuss this opportunity.

Age-Friendly Spotlight: Sparrow Ionia Hospital

Learn how healthcare systems are innovating to address the unique needs of older adults through the MHA Keystone Center’s Age-Friendly Health Systems Action Community.

Located in Ionia, Michigan, Sparrow Ionia Hospital is a 22-bed critical access hospital whose patients ages 65 and older represent half of all admitted patients. The hospital has remained committed to quality and safety and has worked tirelessly to improve care practices for older adult patients since joining the MHA Keystone Center Age-Friendly Health Systems Action Community in 2019.

The hospital is nationally recognized as an Age-Friendly Health System Committed to Care Excellence by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) for working to create an age-friendly environment for patients. Steven Dexter, medical-surgical unit and special care manager, Sparrow Ionia Hospital, shares insight into the hospital’s age-friendly journey below.

What is an Age-Friendly Health System?

Becoming an Age-Friendly Health System entails reliably providing a set of four evidence-based elements of high-quality care, known as the “4Ms,” to all older adults: What Matters, Medication, Mentation and Mobility.

Recognition

The IHI recognizes clinical care settings that are working toward reliable implementation of the 4Ms. As of May 2021, nearly 2,100 healthcare organizations have earned either level 1 (Participant) or level 2 (Committed to Care Excellence) recognition in the Age-Friendly Health Systems movement.

  • Level 1 (Participant) teams have successfully developed plans to implement the 4Ms.​
  • Level 2 (Committed to Care Excellence) teams have three months of verified data to demonstrate early impact of using the 4Ms.

Steven Dexter, medical-surgical unit and special care manager, Sparrow Ionia Hospital, shares insight into the hospital’s age-friendly journey in the following sections below.

Photographed left to right: Lisa Harris, Interim CNO; Sally Fox, House Supervisor Mary Whitelock, clinical nurse educator; Steven Dexter, medical-surgical and special care unit manager; and Mary Ziegler, house supervisor.

Why did you join the Age-Friendly Health Systems Action Community?

The need for special focus on older patients is obvious. Currently, more than half of all patients at Sparrow Ionia are age 65 and older, and that is expected to soar throughout the nation because of the baby-boom generation. Sparrow Ionia recognized the need to change the traditional model of care delivery to improve the care delivered to the growing population of older patients. With the MHA Keystone Center’s support, we can focus on what matters to older adult patients rather than only what’s the matter with them.

How has joining this national movement improved and impacted the way you care for older adults?

The impact of our work has resulted in awareness to caregivers that can help institute the 4M framework and intentionally individualize care to that type of patient. Hence, patients find value in the care received. Awareness is what makes the biggest impact, so we spread daily awareness by reporting the percentage of age-friendly patients who are on our inpatient unit.

As part of the Age-Friendly 4M framework of “what matters,” the caregivers at Sparrow Ionia Hospital ask our older patients certain questions. An example of a “what matters” question we use is, “What is one thing everyone should know that matters to you while you are here?” One patient told me that he had been in the war and was scared and alone at that time and now, even though he is older and wiser, he sometimes feels that same way. I reassured him that all the caregivers were there for him and thanked him for his ultimate service.

The medical-surgical caregivers brainstormed a way to recognize the heroes who served our county and thank them for their service while they are in the hospital. As a result, small American flags are now put outside the door of those patients’ rooms, so all caregivers can recognize and thank our patients who are veterans.

Another conscious thing we do to promote age-friendly care is we use small, yellow “4M” door signs to reveal an age-friendly patient so that every caregiver can know that a patient has something that matters to them. In addition to the signs, we elevate the “what matters” answer by discussing them in the daily multidisciplinary rounds so that care can be patient-centered. The answer is charted in the EMR “sticky note” summary front page of the chart.

In addition to these impactful stories, we have seen an increase in patient satisfaction. Patients verbalize the feeling of being cared for and how happy they are with the care they receive at Sparrow Ionia Hospital.

What is one thing you would like to share with a healthcare organization interested in becoming an Age-Friendly Health System?

Age-Friendly is a foundation that most of us use every day with the care we provide. The great thing about this 4M framework is that it can be used for any age group, resulting in intentional, individualized care that patients will see, hear and feel.

Survey Assesses Need for Older Adult Care Support

As a patient safety and quality organization committed to better outcomes, the MHA Keystone Center is dedicated to supporting health systems across Michigan in becoming age friendly. By adopting evidence-based models and delivery care practices that meet the needs and preferences of older adults, the healthcare system and communities can improve care across the continuum of life.

Members are encouraged to take the MHA Keystone Center’s brief survey to assess health systems’ interests and needs for support around improving care for older adults. This survey will determine priorities and help shape and guide the MHA Keystone Center’s future older-adult care offerings.

Members with questions may contact the MHA Keystone Center.

Medication for Opioid Use Disorder Cuts Hospital Costs, Improves Patient Care

The MHA Keystone Center is working alongside the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan (CFSEM) through the Michigan Opioid Partnership to provide funding and technical assistance for the emergency department-based medication for opioid use disorder (ED MOUD) program. The program will increase access to medication for OUD statewide and connect patients receiving MOUD with appropriate resources to continue care in the community. An online video provides additional information on the program.

The CFSEM recently released impact stories highlighting successes of the program from previous participants. Andrew King, MD, an emergency room physician at Detroit Medical Center and advisor to the CFSEM, has witnessed the effectiveness of MOUD and reminds practitioners that it is possible to guide those with OUD down a path to recovery.

“I can see the people who are now on medications and feeling much better and doing well. They are happy and putting their lives back together, and that’s a beautiful thing!” King says. “By controlling the disease process, maybe they’re treating their kids or their spouse better or they’re doing a better job at work. That’s the whole point of why we signed up for this job — trying to keep people safe and healthy and in the game for as long as possible.” An article from the CFSEM provides additional information.

The MHA has also been advocating to improve legislation related to ED MOUD by working with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services to ensure all hospitals interested in starting an emergency department-based medication assisted treatment program have the funding resources to do so.

Members with questions on the ED MOUD program may contact the MHA Keystone Center.