Peters Speaks to Lansing Rotary on Past, Present and Future of Healthcare

Peters speaks to Lansing Rotarians at weekly meeting.

MHA CEO Brian Peters presented as the keynote speaker at the Rotary Club of Lansing’s weekly meeting May 13, discussing the MHA’s work supporting hospitals and healthcare systems across the full care continuum.

During his presentation, Peters kept his focus on the current workforce shortages Michigan’s hospitals have been facing. “The healthcare workforce staffing shortages existed before COVID-19 but have worsened and are expected to continue beyond this pandemic. Our hospitals must remain ready for and responsive to patients affected by COVID-19 as well as other patients who need urgent and life-saving care outside of COVID-19,” said Peters.

Peters also discussed the election forecast for the year ahead and what implications the midterm election will have on the healthcare community. To learn more about these issues facing healthcare, visit the MHA’s Workforce Sustainability and Elections pages.

Headline Roundup: Price Transparency, Workforce Challenges and Contrast Media Shortages

Brian Peters

Brian PetersThe MHA responded to several media requests the week of May 16 on topics including the RAND 4.0 Hospital Price Transparency Study, hospital workforce challenges and the shortage of contrast media from GE Healthcare.

MiBiz and Crain’s Detroit Business published stories on the latest RAND report that includes multiple quotes from MHA CEO Brian Peters discussing the flaws associated with the study, including the use of Medicare as a reimbursement benchmark and the limited data set. The MiBiz story also cites recent findings from the American Hospital Association and Kaufman Hall on significantly increasing hospital expenses.

“So it’s not a comprehensive set. It’s looking very specifically at Medicare reimbursement rates, which we know in Michigan and other states as well does not cover the true cost of care,” said Peters to MiBiz. “Hospitals do everything they possibly can just to break even, at best, and still lose money on Medicare.”

Michigan Radio aired a feature on May 16 following an interview with Peters on workforce challenges impacting hospitals.

“We are losing employees to McDonald’s for a job that pays better and is less stressful,” said Peters. “And we are incredibly limited in our ability to compete with rising wages in other industries.”

Crain’s Detroit Business published an additional article May 18 on the topic that cited the Michigan Radio story and quotes Peters. Laura Appel, executive vice president of government relations and public policy, MHA, also spoke with WZZM-TV Channel 13 for a story on workforce challenges that aired May 19.

The Detroit Free Press and Fox 2 Detroit also reached out earlier in the week on the reported shortage of contrast media from GE Healthcare. A general statement was provided to reflect the varying impacts from the shortage on hospitals throughout the state.

MHA Monday Report May 16, 2022

MHA Monday Report

MHA Covid-19 update

Combating the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19): Week of May 9

COVID-19 hospitalizations in Michigan have been rising in recent weeks, with 875 adults hospitalized with confirmed or suspected cases on May 11; 77 of that number were in intensive care units. In addition, 36 children were in the hospital with confirmed or suspected cases on that date. A daily average of over 2,700 cases …


Final Procedural Step for CRNA Legislation Completed

Legislation enhancing hospital flexibility for anesthesia care went into full effect May 10 following official confirmation from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services that it had received the letter of attestation sent by the governor. This was the final step needed for the provisions in House Bill …


capitol building

Michigan Legislators Act on Healthcare Bills

Several bills impacting hospitals were acted upon during the week of May 9. Bills to plan for new funding from the national opioid settlement and to allow for certain out-of-state prescriptions were sent to the governor. In the Senate, testimony was taken on a bill to create a new license for …


Annual Meeting icon

MHA Annual Meeting Registration Deadline Approaching

The registration deadline is May 27 for the MHA Annual Membership Meeting June 29, 30 and July 1 on Mackinac Island. COVID-19 vaccination is required for attendees 12 years of age and older; details surrounding the vaccination verification process are outlined on the Code of Conduct …


EIGFFellowship Helps Trustees Think Critically About the Future

Strategic thinking is a critical skill for all healthcare leaders, and the future belongs to organizations whose governing boards, working in strategic partnership with management, help envision the future and assist in discerning and framing questions the organization should ask of itself to prepare for the future. …


Webinar Reviews Infection Control Worksheet Compliance

Antibiotics have transformed the practice of medicine, making once lethal infections readily treatable and other medical advances possible. Like all medications, antibiotics can have serious unintended consequences, such as causing a patient to have an adverse drug reaction or a patient misusing the …


The Keckley Report

Paul Keckley

Overturning Roe v. Wade Creates Immediate Challenges for Healthcare

“Politico broke its story at 8:32 pm last Monday: ‘Supreme Court has voted to overturn abortion rights, draft opinion shows.’ …

“Their reporting was based on a leaked copy of the February 10, 98-page draft of Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito’s opinion on behalf of the court’s 5 conservative justices …

“The final ruling is expected next month but the immediate implications for the healthcare industry are significant.”

Paul Keckley, May 9, 2022


MHA in the News

The MHA received media coverage the week of May 9 on an upcoming implicit bias training requirement and extending Medicaid coverage to 12 months postpartum.

Media Recap: Implicit Bias Training & Medicaid Maternal Health Coverage

Brian Peters

The MHA received media coverage the week of May 9 on the upcoming Public Health Code Rules requiring implicit bias training for all professions licensed or registered under the Public Health Code and the recently approved extension by The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services of Michigan Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program coverage for 12 months after pregnancy.

Bridge published May 11 a story on the healthcare industry’s reaction to the June 1 implementation date of the implicit bias training requirement. MHA CEO Brian Peters is quoted in the article expressing the positive reaction from hospitals on the requirement and their commitment to eliminate health disparities.

“There’s been no push back,” said Peters. “Everyone realizes this is the right thing to do.”

State of Reform also published May 10 an article on the increase in coverage for postpartum mothers from 60 days after birth to a full year in Michigan. Laura Appel, executive vice president of government relations and public policy, MHA, spoke with State of Reform on the importance of this coverage extension towards addressing maternal mortality and racial disparities.

“It feels counterintuitive to why healthcare coverage for women would end 60 days after they gave birth,” said Appel. “You would in no way expect coverage to end so quickly.”

MHA Monday Report May 2, 2022

MHA Monday Report

Michigan Legislature Continues Work on Budget, Opioid Settlement Fundscapitol building


MHA Unemployment Compensation Program Receives National Recognition


MDHHS Proposes to Cover Doula Services for Medicaid Beneficiaries

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services recently released a proposed policy for Medicaid coverage of doula services effective Oct. 1, 2022, contingent upon approval by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The MHA supports this proposal and agrees with …


Annual Meeting iconMHA Annual Membership Meeting Returns to In-person Format

The 2022 MHA Annual Membership Meeting will return to an in-person meeting June 29, 30 and July 1 on Mackinac Island. COVID-19 vaccination is required for attendees 12 years of age and older, and details surrounding the vaccination verification …


MHA Rounds Report - Brian Peters, MHA CEOMHA CEO Report — GME’s Role in the Healthcare Talent Pipeline

MHA CEO Brian Peters reviews the vital role of graduate medical education in the healthcare talent pipeline.


EIGF

Trustees Play Significant Role in Healthcare Recovery

COVID-19 has reshaped the healthcare environment. Emerging trends will have implications for years to come and the way hospitals and boards lead through recovery — be it financial, clinical or emotional  …


The Keckley Report

Paul Keckley

The Long-term Consequence of Physician Employment in U.S. Healthcare

“The short-term impact of physician employment is closely monitored. But the long-term consequence of employed physicians is somewhat unclear. Currently, four major players are prominent in the mix; physician employment plays a critical role in each.”

Paul Keckley, April 25, 2022


News to Know

The MHA will host a lunch and learn webinar from noon to 12:45 p.m. ET May 11 with MHA Endorsed Business Partner NextJob to provide an update on the latest labor market trends and leading practices to attract and keep valuable employees.


MHA in the News

The MHA received media coverage the week of April 25 on rural hospital challenges and COVID-19 hospitalizations.

MHA CEO Report — GME’s Role in the Healthcare Talent Pipeline

MHA Rounds Report - Brian Peters, MHA CEO

“Medical education does not exist to provide students with a way of making a living, but to ensure the health of the community.” ― Rudolf Virchow

MHA Rounds Report - Brian Peters, MHA CEOAs we enter the final two months of the MHA program year, our “all-hands-on-deck” prioritization of the healthcare workforce continues, and I am pleased to share that we have made significant strides in this regard. Included in that progress is work with our partners in higher education, other Michigan healthcare associations, hospital clinical leaders and the Michigan Legislature.

One aspect of our workforce efforts is not new. For many years, the MHA has led a special Graduate Medical Education (GME) Advocacy Day, hosted at our MHA Capitol Advocacy Center (CAC) in downtown Lansing. At this event, medical students, residents from teaching hospitals and academic medical centers, and other key leaders converge on the Capitol and meet with legislators to discuss the vital importance of GME funding in the state budget process.

After a brief hiatus due to the pandemic, we are excited to play host once again for this important in-person event, as we will welcome our colleagues to the CAC on May 5.

When this event began, the primary focus was to express the importance of GME and the national prominence that Michigan has earned in medical education. We have more than 7,200 physician residents currently working in the state, which ranks fourth in the nation. In addition, Michigan is third in the country for student enrollment in public medical schools. The investment Michigan makes in GME is very valuable, as every $1 in GME generates $2.53 in federal funding in fiscal year 2022. While the current rate is enhanced due to the existing public health emergency, there is no question that GME funding for Michigan’s beginning physicians is a wise investment for the future healthcare workforce in our state. GME also improves access to care, as it allows physicians to further their medical education while delivering much-needed care to patients throughout Michigan in teaching hospitals, community clinics and laboratories.

The vital role of GME in filling the talent pipeline is more important today than ever, as Michigan hospitals (and the healthcare delivery system in general) struggle with workforce shortages that have been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Those shortages across the state have caused Michigan to lose approximately 1,300 staffed hospital beds over the past 18 months. Nationally, the physician shortage is estimated to be between 37,800 and 124,000 by 2034, including primary care and nonprimary care specialties, as the Association of American Medical Colleges estimates two out of every five active physicians will be 65 or older within the next 10 years.

The participants in our GME Advocacy Day have experienced many of the challenges that we’ve shared with elected officials: stress, burnout, workplace violence, vaccine hesitancy and significant loss of life due to COVID-19 and a host of other medical issues. Their perspective is extremely valuable as we make the case for funding and public policy that ensures the viability of our healthcare infrastructure for years to come. In addition to full funding of the traditional GME pool, there are several related items on the radar screen here in Lansing, including:

  • Included in the state’s Higher Education budget proposal is House Bill 5785, which would provide funding to create a healthcare workforce collaborative between the MHA and Michigan’s public and private post-secondary educational institutions. This partnership would not only provide employers with a better understanding of statewide graduates in health professions, but further improve the knowledge of employment opportunities in healthcare for post-secondary education institutions throughout the state. Included in the collaborative would be the creation of a searchable and accessible repository that allows healthcare employers to understand current educational trends and provides prospective employees easy access to healthcare positions throughout the state.
  • The MHA also supports legislation designed to incentivize more medical school and advanced practice nursing program preceptors by providing new tax credits. Senate Bills 998 and 999 would create a new tax credit for individuals who agree to work as a preceptor for required clinical rotations. We believe this legislation could help increase the capacity for clinical rotations at hospitals across the state, which would also improve the talent pipeline.

As we advocate in support of GME and related issues, we of course greatly appreciate the collaboration of our friends from the Michigan State Medical Society (MSMS) and Michigan Osteopathic Association (MOA). Together, our three associations make up The Partnership for Michigan’s Health, which has a long history of working together on healthcare issues of common interest, including the achievement of major medical liability reforms in the early 1990s, which established the foundation for much of our advocacy work in the Legislature and the courts ever since.

Most recently, the collective voice of our three associations, along with associations representing various other areas of healthcare, led to successfully securing $300 million in state funding for the recruitment, retention and training of healthcare workers. Collectively, the Healthcare Workforce Sustainability Coalition was created to focus on workers already within the healthcare workforce. Gov. Whitmer also recently signed Senate Bill 247 that would decrease wait times for commercial insurance prior authorization requests, a priority for all three associations. We are also united in our opposition to Senate Bill 990 that would create a serious public health risk by licensing naturopathic practitioners and classifying them as physicians. As healthcare associations, the professional careers of our members are dedicated to serving their patients and protecting the health and safety of the public. This opposition is an example of our need to protect the public from a practice that lacks scientifically proven treatment methods and clinical training.

In addition, we have long collaborated with MSMS and MOA to produce The Economic Impact of Healthcare in Michigan Report, which provides a detailed look at the extensive roles hospitals and health systems play in their local economies. Work is underway on the next issue of the report. The MHA Keystone Center Board of Directors has also designated one seat each for the MSMS and the MOA since its inception to ensure physician representation as we strategize on safety and quality improvement issues. And finally, the MHA and the MOA literally got closer last year when the MOA relocated its offices to the MHA headquarters building in Okemos – an arrangement that is unique anywhere in the country.

I’d also be remiss if I didn’t mention the MHA’s new focus on engaging with our physician leaders. For the first time ever, the MHA will be hosting activities dedicated to our physician leaders during our MHA Annual Meeting, including several sessions that will include CME credits. MHA Chief Medical Officer Dr. Gary Roth is leading these efforts, which complement his work throughout the pandemic engaging with our health system chief medical officers to facilitate consistent and reliable dialogue that allowed the MHA to efficiently provide policy updates to our clinicians as well as real-time feedback to policymakers. We’re extremely fortunate to have Dr. Roth, as the MHA is one of just a few state hospital associations with a full-time CMO on its leadership team.

Lastly, in an effort to fully support our physician colleagues (and other caregivers), the MHA Keystone Center is offering the Well-being Essentials for Learning Life-Balance (WELL-B) webinar series to prevent healthcare burnout by delivering weekly webinars on evidence-based well-being topics, including prevalence and severity of burnout, relationship resilience and being present. It is encouraging to see that over 4,000 individuals have already signed up for this innovative program.

As you can see, there is no magic pill that can solve the healthcare staffing crisis overnight. It will take many years and a multitude of public and private solutions to protect access for all of Michigan’s communities. GME is one of those key solutions, and we call on our elected officials – and all Michiganders – to give it the support it deserves.

As always, I welcome your thoughts.

Peters Focuses on Rural Hospital Challenges in Rural Innovation eXchange Story

MHA CEO Brian Peters

MHA CEO Brian Peters

Rural Innovation eXchange interviewed MHA CEO Brian Peters for a story published April 28 that examines the challenges facing rural hospitals in Michigan.

Peters discussed staffing shortages and efforts to improve workforce sustainability, the impact of COVID-19 on hospital finances and cybersecurity threats.

“The [workforce] pipeline is going to be so important,” said Peters. “The pipeline as it exists today is not adequate, particularly in rural areas, which are significantly older than non-rural areas and have older and sicker patients. This also means that the phenomenon of folks leaving the field is felt more acutely in rural communities.”

Other healthcare executives appearing in the story include John T. Foss, vice president of operations, Mercy Health Lakeshore Campus; Steve Barnett, president and CEO, McKenzie Health; and JJ Hodshire, president and CEO, Hillsdale Hospital.

The MHA also provided comment to Michigan Radio for a story published April 27 on increasing COVID hospitalizations due to the omicron BA.2 variant.

“…[B]ut there are clear indications that the severity of illness is down and so we hope there will not be a surge of COVID hospitalizations like the state has experienced previously,” said John Karasinski, director, communications, MHA.

MHA Monday Report April 18, 2022

MHA Monday Report

MHA Covid-19 update

Combating the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19): Week of April 11

The number of confirmed and suspected cases of COVID-19 in Michigan went up April 7-13 from the previous week, rising from an average of 750 per day to 1,104 per day. Out of the 7,725 confirmed and suspected cases that week, 81 Michiganders …


Board of Trustees Meets at MHA Capitol Advocacy Center

The MHA Board of Trustees met at the MHA’s downtown Lansing offices April 13 and were joined by Michigan House of Representatives Appropriations Committee Chair Thomas Albert (R-Lowell). Albert provided an update on the progress of the fiscal year 2023 state budget, which includes funding for …


capitol building

State Legislature Discusses Multiple Bills Affecting Healthcare


MHA Annual Membership Meeting Registration Open

MHA members will return to an in-person annual meeting June 29 through July 1 on Mackinac Island. COVID-19 vaccination is required for attendees 12 years of age and older; details surrounding the vaccination verification process are outlined …


State Extension of Medicaid/CHIP Coverage for 12 Months Postpartum Approved

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services recently approved an extension of Michigan Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program coverage for 12 months after pregnancy, up from 60 days, effective April 1, 2022. This coverage extension is expected to apply to approximately 16,000 pregnant and …


Skilled Nursing Facility Prospective Payment System Proposed Rule Released

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services recently released a proposed rule to update the Medicare fee-for-service prospective payment system for skilled nursing facilities for fiscal year 2023. …


Proposal Would Update Hospice Payment System

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services recently released a proposed rule to update Medicare fee-for-service hospice payment rates, wage index, beneficiary cap amount and quality reporting program requirements for fiscal year 2023, which begins Oct. 1, 2022. …


EIGFExcellence in Governance Fellowship Prepares Trustees to Lead

The MHA Excellence in Governance Fellowship is the best choice to help prepare health organization board members to excel in performing their vital responsibilities as hospitals and health systems navigate an environment where COVID-19 is endemic. Launched 20 …


MHA Comments on Telecommunications/Broadband Rules for Rural Hospitals

The MHA submitted a comment letter April 14 on behalf of its rural hospital members to the Federal Communications Commission in response to its request for input on proposed rulemaking to improve the Rural Health Care Program. …


New Podcast Explores Social Determinants of Health with Wright Lassiter

The MHA released another episode of the MiCare Champion Cast, which features interviews with healthcare policy experts in Michigan on key issues that impact healthcare and the health of communities. …


Workplace Safety and Minority Health Recognized in April

National organizations are recognizing April as Workplace Violence Awareness Month and Minority Health Month, each of which are key priorities for the Michigan Health & Hospital Association. The Alliance Against Workplace Violence is leading efforts for Workplace Violence Awareness Month while the U.S. …


The Keckley Report

Paul Keckley

U.S. Healthcare and Inflation: A Tipping Point

“Inflation hit a 40-year high of 7.9% in the first quarter of 2022. Driven by higher gas and food prices, the average household’s expenses have increased $433/month this year and the end is not in sight.

“It is taking its toll on consumers– disproportionately in lower income households, rural communities, the unhealthy and frail elderly and non-white populations. Recent polling underscores the gravity of the public mood.”

Paul Keckley, April 11, 2022


News to Know

  • The MHA will host a webinar from noon to 12:30 p.m. ET April 27 to discuss compliance support for the No Surprises Act.
  • The MHA will host a webinar from 10 to 11 a.m. ET April 28 with ParaRev to provide coding and billing guidance related to COVID-19.
  • MHA CEO Brian Peters issued a statement April 13 on the tragic shooting of Patrick Lyoya.

MHA Issues Statement on the Tragic Death of Patrick Lyoya

The following statement can be attributed to Brian Peters, CEO of the Michigan Health & Hospital Association.

The video footage released today of the tragic shooting death of Patrick Lyoya in Grand Rapids is jarring and incredibly disturbing. Almost two years ago, our nation witnessed the murder of George Floyd, which exposed for our entire country the racial injustices that exist in our communities. What happened April 4 in one of Michigan’s neighborhoods to Patrick Lyoya is unacceptable and shows that our state has so much more to accomplish to address systemic racism.

We express our deepest condolences to the family of Patrick Lyoya, those mourning his loss and all individuals who share these feelings of fear and anger at another Black community member losing their life unnecessarily.

Hospitals are a welcoming place of care for all those who need our services. The mission of the MHA is to advance the health of individuals and communities, and that mission is inclusive of every race, ethnicity and nationality. What happened to Patrick Lyoya is not acceptable; we stand with all our patients, their loved ones, our communities and our employees as we come to terms with Patrick’s unnecessary death.

Hospitals throughout our state will reflect on this tragedy as a time to come together and share peaceful expressions of our hurt and anguish. Following Mr. Floyd’s tragic death, MHA member hospital and health system chief executive officers signed a pledge expressing a unified commitment to address racial disparities, dismantle institutional racism and achieve health equity. We promise our efforts will not stop until we have achieved those goals.

Workplace Safety and Minority Health Recognized in April

National organizations are recognizing April as Workplace Violence Awareness Month and Minority Health Month, each of which are key priorities for the Michigan Health & Hospital Association. The Alliance Against Workplace Violence is leading efforts for Workplace Violence Awareness Month while the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health is promoting Minority Health Month.

MHA CEO Brian Peters
MHA CEO Brian Peters

“The mission of the MHA is to advance the health of individuals and communities,” said MHA CEO Brian Peters. “Ensuring the safety of our healthcare workers and improving efforts to address health equity, diversity and inclusion fulfills our mission and is critical to every Michigan hospital and community.”

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the healthcare sector had the highest distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in the private sector in 2020, while OSHA data indicates healthcare workers are nearly four times more likely on average to experience violence than individuals in other industries.

Improving workplace safety in hospitals has been the focus of the MHA, the MHA Keystone Center and Michigan hospitals since the MHA Workplace Safety Collaborative was launched in 2019 with the goal to reduce injuries and increase safety awareness through educational events, webinar series and insights from subject matter experts.

With reported rates of violence against healthcare workers increasing during surges of COVID-19 hospitalizations, the MHA has actively advocated for House Bill 5682. This legislation would double the fines for assaulting a healthcare employee or volunteer in any healthcare setting. To help increase awareness of protecting healthcare workers, the MHA has developed and provided to MHA members free of charge workplace violence posters.

Diversity, equity and inclusion is another key component of the activities of the MHA Keystone Center. The MHA Board of Trustees endorsed in 2020 the Address Racism and Health Inequities pledge, which has since been embraced by all MHA member hospitals and hospital systems. The pledge expresses the need for hospitals to commit to addressing disparities, dismantling institutional racism and achieving health equity. The MHA Keystone Center also released the Eliminating Disparities to Advance Health Equity and Improve Quality guide, which is to be used by hospitals to assess strategies aimed at reducing disparities, achieving equity and improving quality.

“I am very proud of the work the MHA Keystone Center has made on both workplace safety and diversity, equity and inclusion,” said Sarah Scranton, MPA, MPP, vice president, safety and quality, MHA, and executive director, MHA Keystone Center. “The safety of caregivers and addressing health disparities can significantly impact the quality and safety of care delivered inside a hospital.”

Health equity is achieved when all members of society enjoy a fair and just opportunity to be as healthy as possible. As defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, social determinants of health contribute to racial and ethnic minority groups having disproportionate health outcomes and include neighborhood and physical environment, health and healthcare, occupation and job conditions, income and wealth, and education. The MHA and the MHA Keystone Center have long been committed to addressing health disparities, which is a foundational concept that shapes all the organization’s quality improvement and safety efforts.

More information about the MHA’s efforts and resources on workplace safety and health equity can be found at mha.org.