Survey Published for Opioid Use Disorder Contacts

In preparation for the state’s anticipated grant program to implement an Emergency Department Medication for Opioid Use Disorder (ED MOUD) program, the MHA is asking all members to fill out a short survey by Sept. 23 to provide contact information for those within each member organization who support OUD work.

The Michigan Senate and House recently both passed Senate Bill 597, which requires all Michigan emergency departments who do not otherwise opt-out to implement an ED MOUD program. The governor has not yet signed the bill into law, but the MHA anticipates Gov. Whitmer will sign the bill in the coming months.

While ED MOUD programming currently exists and many Michigan hospitals are already implementing it, the bill will require the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services to create a grant program to provide financial support to emergency departments to implement ED MOUD programs. This funding will be available only to those with more than 50 overdose encounters a year. Hospitals will be required to either opt-out or complete an application for funding. As such, the MHA Keystone Center – which has been working closely with Michigan hospitals currently implementing the ED MOUD program – is preparing to support members once the bill is signed. Given the anticipated tight turnaround to complete paperwork, it is imperative for the MHA Keystone Center to have the appropriate contacts to aid in the registration or opt-out process.

Members with questions about the requirements can reach out to the MHA Keystone Center.

 

MHA CEO Report — Benefits of the State Budget

MHA Rounds Report - Brian Peters, MHA CEO

MHA Rounds Report - Brian Peters, MHA CEO“We must find time to stop and thank the people who make a difference in our lives.” ― John F. Kennedy

We have rightfully spent a lot of time in the past two years thanking the heroes who work in our hospitals and other healthcare settings for the incredible work they have done in the face of extreme challenge.

I want to take a moment now to thank another group of people who have recently helped our cause through their bipartisan actions; our elected officials in Lansing were extremely busy the last week of June passing the fiscal year 2023 state budget, which has since been signed by Gov. Whitmer. Our MHA mission is to advance the health of individuals and communities — and this budget absolutely provides significant help in that regard. While some elements of the new budget represent long-standing MHA priorities, others are new funding items that have the potential to reshape access to care and help our members and the patients and communities they serve.

Our MHA team does a tremendous job advocating for the importance of items such as the Healthy Michigan Plan, graduate medical education of physician residents, disproportionate share hospital funding, maximization of our robust provider tax program and Medicaid payment rates, the rural access pool and obstetrical stabilization fund, and critical access hospital reimbursement rates. Every election cycle, new legislators are welcomed to Lansing and the MHA’s efforts never stop to ensure these decisionmakers are aware of the impact these budget items play in their communities. The bottom line is the financial viability of hospitals is increasingly reliant on these important programs, and the MHA is dedicated to protecting them.

Hospital closures continue to happen across the country. However, they have occurred at a much higher rate in states that have not participated in Medicaid expansion through the Affordable Care Act. Maintaining funding for our expansion program — the Healthy Michigan Plan — has been one of our top priorities, and the pandemic has made the importance of insurance coverage more important than ever. In short, when the pandemic hit and thousands of Michiganders lost their jobs, the Healthy Michigan Plan was there to ensure access to good healthcare.

Our hospitals that treat the highest numbers of uninsured and underinsured patients also qualify for disproportionate share hospital funding, which provides enhanced reimbursement to account for the higher costs of care. This pool is funded through hospital provider taxes that reduce the state’s general fund contribution to the overall Medicaid program.

Small, rural and independent hospitals can often experience financial challenges in a particularly acute way, thus items such as the rural access pool, obstetrical stabilization fund and critical access hospital reimbursement rates also support access to healthcare services in rural areas. Labor and delivery units typically do not contribute to positive margins, but they are extremely important for families and communities. The obstetrical stabilization fund provides additional means for hospitals in rural areas to maintain these services so expectant mothers can avoid driving exorbitant distances for these services. Lastly, the state also included $56 million in new funding to increase Medicaid reimbursement rates for primary care services, which will help individuals on Medicaid receive the necessary primary and preventative care that can help prevent hospitalizations and reduce overall healthcare costs.

The top concern of hospital leaders remains workforce sustainability, and the continued funding for graduate medical education is one tool we must continue to use to maintain the physician talent pipeline that is sorely needed. At the same time, we are extremely happy to see inclusion of state funds to expand access to Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree programs at the state’s community colleges to help address the nurse talent pipeline, a $56 million line item. This proposal was supported by the MHA when it was formally introduced, and we look forward to seeing our post-secondary partners implement it to grow the healthcare workforce.

Lastly, behavioral health investments have been at the forefront of our advocacy efforts for some time and we were very pleased to see new funding to improve and enhance state behavioral health facility capacity. Michigan lacks adequate capacity to treat patients with behavioral and mental illness and this new funding is an important and necessary step to address the shortage. Included is $50 million to expand pediatric inpatient behavioral health capacity, $30 million to establish crisis stabilization units and $10 million to fund the essential health provider loan repayment program to cover behavioral health professionals.

In total, the budget includes $625 million in new investments for behavioral health funding and investments in workforce. While this will not solve all the issues impacting hospitals, it provides needed resources and demonstrates the commitment of lawmakers to a healthy Michigan. This budget also signifies that our work must continue to advocate for the resources necessary for hospitals and health systems to care for all Michiganders. Once again, on behalf of the entire MHA family, I want to acknowledge and thank both Governor Whitmer, as well as lawmakers in the state House and Senate, for their support of this latest state budget. And I would also encourage anyone who cares about access to quality, affordable healthcare to engage in the process, share your stories and input with those who can make a difference going forward. But also remember to say thank you when they support our cause.

As always, I welcome your thoughts.

Fiscal Year 2023 State Budget Signed

capitol building

capitol buildingGov. Whitmer signed July 20 the fiscal year 2023 state budget. Included in the 2023 budget agreement is $625 million in new investments for behavioral health funding and the healthcare workforce. This includes:

  • $50 million to expand pediatric inpatient mental and behavioral health capacity throughout the state.
  • $30 million to establish crisis stabilization units for mental and behavioral healthcare.
  • $10 million to fund the essential health provider loan repayment program to cover behavioral and mental health professionals.
  • New and ongoing funding of $3.5 million to support the statewide trauma system.
  • $56 million to increase Medicaid reimbursement rates for primary care clinician services.
  • $56 million to fund the Michigan Associate Degree in Nursing to Bachelor of Science in Nursing program at community colleges across the state.

Additionally, the state budget provides the resources necessary for hospitals and health systems to continue advancing the health of individuals and communities throughout Michigan. Specifically, the budget reflects the protection or enhancement of many MHA priorities, including:

  • Maintains funding for the Healthy Michigan Plan.
  • Protects funding for the graduate medical education of physician residents.
  • Supports disproportionate share hospitals.
  • Continues funding for the rural access pool and obstetrical stabilization fund.

Each of these funding sources are instrumental to keeping hospitals financially secure, particularly those serving vulnerable and underserved populations. MHA CEO Brian Peters released a statement July 1 applauding the healthcare focus of this budget and highlighting significant investments toward rural and behavioral health. These new appropriations will allow hospitals to continue and expand upon service lines that are in increased demand due to the pandemic.

The governor also made several line-item vetoes that do not directly impact hospital priorities when signing the budget, including vetoes of funding the administration argues is anti-abortion.

Members with questions may contact Adam Carlson.

Peters Discusses Workforce Challenges with Michigan’s Big Show

Brian Peters

Brian PetersMHA CEO Brian Peters spoke with Michael Patrick Shiels of Michigan’s Big Show June 3 as part of the Detroit Regional Chamber’s 2022 Mackinac Policy Conference.

Peters shared how the conference presented an opportunity for MHA members and staff to engage with lawmakers and Gov. Whitmer on the many challenges facing hospitals and health systems, with the primary focus being the healthcare workforce.

“We’re dealing with the same supply chain and inflation issues that everyone else is dealing with, but unlike many others in our economy, our ability to pass those increased costs along to consumers is extremely limited. Medicare and Medicaid tells us what they will pay. Our private insurance contracts are negotiated well in advance with very limited ability to adjust on the fly. We can’t simply overnight increase those salaries and benefits without having a real impact on the bottom line. That is the financial conundrum our member hospitals have today.”

Listen to the interview

MHA CEO Report — GME’s Role in the Healthcare Talent Pipeline

MHA Rounds Report - Brian Peters, MHA CEO

“Medical education does not exist to provide students with a way of making a living, but to ensure the health of the community.” ― Rudolf Virchow

MHA Rounds Report - Brian Peters, MHA CEOAs we enter the final two months of the MHA program year, our “all-hands-on-deck” prioritization of the healthcare workforce continues, and I am pleased to share that we have made significant strides in this regard. Included in that progress is work with our partners in higher education, other Michigan healthcare associations, hospital clinical leaders and the Michigan Legislature.

One aspect of our workforce efforts is not new. For many years, the MHA has led a special Graduate Medical Education (GME) Advocacy Day, hosted at our MHA Capitol Advocacy Center (CAC) in downtown Lansing. At this event, medical students, residents from teaching hospitals and academic medical centers, and other key leaders converge on the Capitol and meet with legislators to discuss the vital importance of GME funding in the state budget process.

After a brief hiatus due to the pandemic, we are excited to play host once again for this important in-person event, as we will welcome our colleagues to the CAC on May 5.

When this event began, the primary focus was to express the importance of GME and the national prominence that Michigan has earned in medical education. We have more than 7,200 physician residents currently working in the state, which ranks fourth in the nation. In addition, Michigan is third in the country for student enrollment in public medical schools. The investment Michigan makes in GME is very valuable, as every $1 in GME generates $2.53 in federal funding in fiscal year 2022. While the current rate is enhanced due to the existing public health emergency, there is no question that GME funding for Michigan’s beginning physicians is a wise investment for the future healthcare workforce in our state. GME also improves access to care, as it allows physicians to further their medical education while delivering much-needed care to patients throughout Michigan in teaching hospitals, community clinics and laboratories.

The vital role of GME in filling the talent pipeline is more important today than ever, as Michigan hospitals (and the healthcare delivery system in general) struggle with workforce shortages that have been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Those shortages across the state have caused Michigan to lose approximately 1,300 staffed hospital beds over the past 18 months. Nationally, the physician shortage is estimated to be between 37,800 and 124,000 by 2034, including primary care and nonprimary care specialties, as the Association of American Medical Colleges estimates two out of every five active physicians will be 65 or older within the next 10 years.

The participants in our GME Advocacy Day have experienced many of the challenges that we’ve shared with elected officials: stress, burnout, workplace violence, vaccine hesitancy and significant loss of life due to COVID-19 and a host of other medical issues. Their perspective is extremely valuable as we make the case for funding and public policy that ensures the viability of our healthcare infrastructure for years to come. In addition to full funding of the traditional GME pool, there are several related items on the radar screen here in Lansing, including:

  • Included in the state’s Higher Education budget proposal is House Bill 5785, which would provide funding to create a healthcare workforce collaborative between the MHA and Michigan’s public and private post-secondary educational institutions. This partnership would not only provide employers with a better understanding of statewide graduates in health professions, but further improve the knowledge of employment opportunities in healthcare for post-secondary education institutions throughout the state. Included in the collaborative would be the creation of a searchable and accessible repository that allows healthcare employers to understand current educational trends and provides prospective employees easy access to healthcare positions throughout the state.
  • The MHA also supports legislation designed to incentivize more medical school and advanced practice nursing program preceptors by providing new tax credits. Senate Bills 998 and 999 would create a new tax credit for individuals who agree to work as a preceptor for required clinical rotations. We believe this legislation could help increase the capacity for clinical rotations at hospitals across the state, which would also improve the talent pipeline.

As we advocate in support of GME and related issues, we of course greatly appreciate the collaboration of our friends from the Michigan State Medical Society (MSMS) and Michigan Osteopathic Association (MOA). Together, our three associations make up The Partnership for Michigan’s Health, which has a long history of working together on healthcare issues of common interest, including the achievement of major medical liability reforms in the early 1990s, which established the foundation for much of our advocacy work in the Legislature and the courts ever since.

Most recently, the collective voice of our three associations, along with associations representing various other areas of healthcare, led to successfully securing $300 million in state funding for the recruitment, retention and training of healthcare workers. Collectively, the Healthcare Workforce Sustainability Coalition was created to focus on workers already within the healthcare workforce. Gov. Whitmer also recently signed Senate Bill 247 that would decrease wait times for commercial insurance prior authorization requests, a priority for all three associations. We are also united in our opposition to Senate Bill 990 that would create a serious public health risk by licensing naturopathic practitioners and classifying them as physicians. As healthcare associations, the professional careers of our members are dedicated to serving their patients and protecting the health and safety of the public. This opposition is an example of our need to protect the public from a practice that lacks scientifically proven treatment methods and clinical training.

In addition, we have long collaborated with MSMS and MOA to produce The Economic Impact of Healthcare in Michigan Report, which provides a detailed look at the extensive roles hospitals and health systems play in their local economies. Work is underway on the next issue of the report. The MHA Keystone Center Board of Directors has also designated one seat each for the MSMS and the MOA since its inception to ensure physician representation as we strategize on safety and quality improvement issues. And finally, the MHA and the MOA literally got closer last year when the MOA relocated its offices to the MHA headquarters building in Okemos – an arrangement that is unique anywhere in the country.

I’d also be remiss if I didn’t mention the MHA’s new focus on engaging with our physician leaders. For the first time ever, the MHA will be hosting activities dedicated to our physician leaders during our MHA Annual Meeting, including several sessions that will include CME credits. MHA Chief Medical Officer Dr. Gary Roth is leading these efforts, which complement his work throughout the pandemic engaging with our health system chief medical officers to facilitate consistent and reliable dialogue that allowed the MHA to efficiently provide policy updates to our clinicians as well as real-time feedback to policymakers. We’re extremely fortunate to have Dr. Roth, as the MHA is one of just a few state hospital associations with a full-time CMO on its leadership team.

Lastly, in an effort to fully support our physician colleagues (and other caregivers), the MHA Keystone Center is offering the Well-being Essentials for Learning Life-Balance (WELL-B) webinar series to prevent healthcare burnout by delivering weekly webinars on evidence-based well-being topics, including prevalence and severity of burnout, relationship resilience and being present. It is encouraging to see that over 4,000 individuals have already signed up for this innovative program.

As you can see, there is no magic pill that can solve the healthcare staffing crisis overnight. It will take many years and a multitude of public and private solutions to protect access for all of Michigan’s communities. GME is one of those key solutions, and we call on our elected officials – and all Michiganders – to give it the support it deserves.

As always, I welcome your thoughts.

Carlson Discusses Workforce Funding with MiBiz

Adam Carlson

Adam CarlsonMiBiz interviewed Adam Carlson, senior vice president, advocacy, for a story published Feb. 27 on the $300 million funding appropriation for healthcare recruitment, retention and training recently signed by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer.

Carlson discussed existing vacancy rates at hospitals, the benefits of the funding, how funding can be used and the process for distributing the funds to hospitals.

“COVID has taken a really serious toll on the mental, physical and emotional wellbeing of our health care employees in the state,” said Carlson. “(The funding) will allow us to start the healing process, provide additional recognition to workers for what they’ve done throughout the pandemic, and really recruit and retain excellent employees so our hospitals can provide safe, high-quality care.”

Headline Roundup: Workforce Funding, Executive Budget and More

The MHA responded to several media requests the week of Feb. 7 on topics including passage Feb. 9 of House Bill 5523 that provides $300 million in healthcare workforce funding, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s Feb. 10 executive state budget recommendation and COVID-19 hospitalizations.

The MHA published statements on behalf of MHA CEO Brian Peters in reaction to the Michigan Legislature passing HB 5523 and the executive budget recommendation.

Below is a collection of headlines from around the state that reference the statements or include quotes from MHA representatives.

Thursday, Feb. 10

Wednesday, Feb. 9

Tuesday, Feb. 8

Members with any questions regarding media requests should be directed to John Karasinski at the MHA.

Healthcare Priorities Protected, Workforce Sustainability Addressed in Executive Budget

MHA CEO Brian Peters

MHA CEO Brian PetersThe following statement can be attributed to Brian Peters, CEO of the Michigan Health & Hospital Association.

Crucial healthcare funding sources remain protected in the fiscal year 2023 executive budget recommendation. We’d like to express our gratitude toward Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and her administration for their commitment supporting rural and critical access hospitals, graduate medical education, the Healthy Michigan Plan and Michigan’s Medicaid population.

Our hospitals are also experiencing a staffing crisis that requires multiple solutions. We are thrilled to see programs that would improve retention and recruitment of healthcare workers. The proposed Hero Pay recognizes the tremendous dedication and sacrifice of healthcare workers throughout the pandemic, while the talent pipeline will be expanded through additional investments in medical education and reviewing potential licensing flexibility for foreign-trained medical professionals.

Michigan’s behavioral health system is also stressed to its limits, and we’re encouraged to see a greater focus and financial resources toward providing potentially transformational improvements to the state’s behavioral health system that can address many of the challenges patients and families currently face.

We’d be remiss if we did not thank all lawmakers and state officials who have worked tirelessly over the past two years to provide relief and support to hospitals and health systems over the course of the pandemic. As we enter another budget cycle, we look forward to continuing to engage with the Michigan Legislature to advance the health of Michigan individuals and communities.

MHA Statement on Passage of Vital Healthcare Workforce Funding

Brian Peters

The following statement can be attributed to Brian Peters, CEO of the Michigan Health & Hospital Association.

MHA CEO Brian PetersHospitals throughout all regions of Michigan are experiencing significant workforce shortages. The passage today of House Bill 5523 provides critically needed resources for recruitment and retention of healthcare workers to care for our communities. This funding is vital to assist hospitals and health systems in addressing high job vacancy rates, providing training and development, and supporting existing workers who have resiliently provided care for patients throughout the two years of this pandemic.

We’d like to express our gratitude to the Michigan Legislature for prioritizing this funding that will go directly toward Michigan healthcare workers. We encourage Gov. Whitmer to sign this bill as soon as it reaches her desk to bring urgently needed relief to our healthcare workforce.

MHA Statement on Passage of Senate Bill 759

MHA CEO Brian Peters

The following statement can be attributed to Brian Peters, CEO of the Michigan Health & Hospital Association.

Brian Peters

The situation in Michigan hospitals is dire and the overwhelming support of Senate Bill 759 from the Michigan Legislature places into law another tool hospitals can use to address staffing shortages in the short-term. We appreciate the speed which lawmakers prioritized this bill and encourage Gov. Whitmer to sign this important piece of legislation so out-of-state providers who are in good standing and trained, educated, and experienced to provide medical care can continue to do so in Michigan without a Michigan-specific license.