MHA Monday Report Nov. 14, 2022

MHA Monday Report

MI Vote Matters logoRecapping 2022 Election Results

Midterm election results are in, bringing new leadership to the Michigan Legislature and a returning administration at the top of the ticket. Election 2022 will bring significant change to Lansing, as Democrats will now control the Governor’s office and both chambers of the state legislature for the first time since 1984 …


capitol buildingLegislature Returns for Lame Duck Session

The legislature returned during the week of Nov. 7 to vote on legislative leadership and kickoff the 2022 lame-duck session. Only a handful of MHA-tracked bills saw action, including legislation to implement the new federal Rural Emergency Hospital (REH) designation …


CMS Finalizes Rate Cuts in 2023 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently released the 2023 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (PFS) final rule, effective Jan. 1, 2023. The rule reduces the PFS conversion factor by $1.55 (4.7%) to $33.06 in a calendar year (CY) 2023 from $34.61 in CY 2022 …


October MA Enrollment Increases by 17,000 Beneficiaries

Medicare Advantage (MA) enrollment in Michigan totaled approximately 1.22 million in October, an increase of 17,000 beneficiaries since July. The October enrollment is spread across 48 MA plans that are currently operating in the state …


The MHA Keystone Center Offers Ongoing Workforce Well-Being Courses

Through a partnership with the Duke Center for Healthcare Safety and Quality, the MHA Keystone Center is pleased to offer the second iteration of its WELL-B webinar series geared to support healthcare workers experiencing burnout …


The Keckley Report 

Paul KeckleyThe Physician Pay Rule in Context: Profession “Heal Thyself”

“Last Tuesday, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published its 2023 payment schedule for physicians along with changes in the Medicare shared savings program, outpatient, behavioral and home health services…

Healthcare is at a crossroad. Physicians are caught in the crossfire of policies to lower health costs and capital necessary to transform the system from specialty care and volume-based incentives to value and wellbeing.”

Paul Keckley, Nov. 7, 2022


Laura AppelMHA in the News

The MHA received media coverage on the continued surge of RSV cases across Michigan’s pediatric hospitals that is stressing hospital capacity during the week of Nov. 6. Laura Appel, executive vice president …

Headline Roundup: Pediatric Hospital Capacity & Medical Respite

Laura Appel

Laura AppelThe MHA received media coverage on the continued surge of RSV cases across Michigan’s pediatric hospitals that is stressing hospital capacity during the week of Nov. 6. Laura Appel, executive vice president of government relations and public policy, MHA, also contributed to a story on the importance of medical respite with Michigan’s vulnerable population who need continued care after discharge from the hospital.

Below is a collection of headlines from around the state that include interviews or statements from MHA representatives.

Friday, Nov. 11

Thursday, Nov. 10

Monday, Nov. 7

Members with any questions regarding media requests should contact John Karasinski at the MHA.

MHA Monday Report Nov. 7, 2022

MHA Monday Report

MHA Board of Trustees Advances Strategic Action Plan, Affirms Policy Panel Legislative Recommendations

The MHA Board of Trustees began their Nov. 2 meeting with a review of key communication strategies to assist hospitals and health systems to “tell their stories” about the unprecedented financial and workforce challenges they currently face and how they are adapting to meet the critical healthcare and economic development needs of their communities …


Logo for MI Vote Matters, Tuesday Nov. 8Healthcare Community Urged to Vote in Nov. 8 General Election

The MHA encourages its staff, members and other stakeholders in the healthcare community to vote in the state’s general election Nov. 8.- Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. …


Parents Urged to Take Preventive Measures as Pediatric Beds Fill Up

Michigan children’s hospitals and pediatric healthcare leaders are raising awareness about a pediatric hospital bed shortage and urging the public to help prevent respiratory illnesses, which are rapidly spreading in the form of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza …


CMS Releases Final Rule to Update OPPS

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recently released a final rule to update the Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) effective Jan. 1, 2023 …


Provider Enrollment Requirements Reinstated Effective Dec. 1, 2022

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) issued MMP 22-38 COVID-19 Response: Termination of Bulletin MSA 20-28, which reinstates provider enrollment requirements …


CMS Releases Final to Update Medicare PPS Effective 2023

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recently released a final rule to update the Medicare fee-for-service home health (HH) prospective payment system (PPS) effective Jan. 1, 2023 …


MHA Supports Increased Access to Affordable Post-Secondary Education

The MHA, along with stakeholders across diverse fields, supported record state investment in Michigan’s future workforce. On October 11th, the Governor signed Public Act 212 of 2022 establishing the Michigan Achievement Scholarship, and applications starting with students in the high school class of 2023 will now be eligible for increased state financial aid …


CE Credits Available for Unionization and Legal Guidelines Webinar

The webinar Dispelling Misinformation About Unionization and Legal Guidelines 8:30 – 10 a.m. ET Nov. 11 has been approved by HR Certification Institute® (HRCI®) for 1.5 hours …


MHA Rounds Report - Brian Peters, MHA CEOMHA CEO Report — Your Vote Matters

At the MHA, we often say that politics is not a spectator sport. It requires continual engagement and relationship building so that when you are in a crisis and need assistance, you have trusted friends you can turn to …


The Keckley ReportPaul Keckley

The Three Blind Spots in Hospital Strategic Plans

“For 40 years, I have facilitated Board Retreats for hospitals, health systems, insurance plans and medical groups. At no time has the level of uncertainty about the future for hospitals been as intense nor the importance of a forward-looking strategic vision and planning been as necessary as now. The issues are complicated: lag indicators about demand, clinical innovations, reimbursement, costs et al are a foreboding backdrop for these discussions. And three issues have surfaced as blind spots in the environmental assessments and deliberations preceding the plan …”

Paul Keckley, Oct 31, 2022


Michigan Harvest GatheringsNews to Know

Many Michigan hospitals are underway with their Michigan Harvest Gathering campaign which runs through Nov. 18. Online donations by hospital employees and community members to the Michigan Harvest Gathering program can be made through the Food Bank Council of Michigan’s website …


MHA in the News

The MHA received media coverage on the surge of RSV cases across Michigan’s pediatric hospitals during the week of Oct. 31. The coverage included several comments provided to news outlets and the distribution of a press release Nov. 4 to statewide media …

Headline Roundup: RSV Straining Pediatric Hospitals

The MHA received media coverage on the surge of RSV cases across Michigan’s pediatric hospitals during the week of Oct. 31. The coverage included several comments provided to news outlets and the distribution of a press release Nov. 4 to statewide media.

Below is a collection of headlines from around the state that include interviews or statements from MHA representatives.

Sunday, Nov. 6

Friday, Nov. 4

Wednesday, Nov. 2

Monday, Oct. 31

Members with any questions regarding media requests should contact John Karasinski at the MHA.

Parents Urged to Take Preventive Measures As Pediatric Beds Fill Up

As Respiratory Viruses Circulate, Michigan Hospitals Urge Vigilance, Prevention

Michigan children’s hospitals and pediatric healthcare leaders are raising awareness about a pediatric hospital bed shortage and urging the public to help prevent respiratory illnesses, which are rapidly spreading in the form of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza.

Michigan pediatric intensive care unit hospital beds are currently 89% occupied, according to data from the Michigan Health & Hospital Association (MHA) and Michigan Department of Health & Human Services (MDHHS). Hospitals are also reporting large surges in young patients visiting emergency departments, for both emergent and non-emergent care. Hospitals are urging those with mild cold-like symptoms to stay at home. If symptoms worsen, an urgent care or primary care physician’s office would be the most appropriate setting to seek care, while emergency department visits should be reserved for those with moderate to severe symptoms including shortness of breath. Wait times and patient volumes in emergency rooms are increasing, and emergency department capacity in some areas is being depleted by visits for non-emergency medical conditions. Pervasive hospital staff shortages further complicate surges in hospital visits.

These pediatric bed shortages are impacting care statewide, making transfers of the sickest young patients to higher acuity care settings difficult.

“Hospitals are here for Michiganders, particularly in emergencies,” said Gary Roth, DO, chief medical officer, MHA. “But our capacity to provide pediatric hospital care is extremely strained. Right now, the staffing challenges we have been sounding the alarms about all year combined with rapid spread of respiratory illnesses are impacting our hospitals’ ability to care for our sickest children in a timely manner.”

The MHA and the MDHHS are monitoring the pediatric bed capacity among Michigan hospitals. Nationally, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services data shows that 76% of pediatric beds across the country are full, with anecdotal reports largely pinning the shortage on widespread RSV infections.

“Many of us in the pediatric medical community across Michigan are working to care for the surge of children battling RSV,” Matthew Denenberg, MD, chief of pediatrics, Corewell Health East, the new name for Beaumont Health, and chair of the MHA’s Council on Children’s Health. “Our teams are here to help when the illness becomes severe. Parents and guardians can also help stop the spread of illness in our communities by getting children vaccinated against both flu and COVID-19. We all need to work together to keep our children safe.”

“In recent weeks we have seen a significant surge in cases of RSV which is most greatly impacting our infants and young children,” said Rudolph Valentini, MD, chief medical officer, Children’s Hospital of Michigan. “Since Oct. 1, more than 450 patients have tested positive for RSV at our hospital. This is putting a strain on our hospital’s emergency department and inpatient bed capacity; further, this could intensify if influenza cases begin to rise in the near future. It is also important to note that RSV and its associated bronchiolitis cause symptomatic disease in 20% of infants and children less than one year of age. Although RSV may only cause a mild cold in older children and adults, it is important for parents to keep their infants and young children away from others who are ill, because RSV causes inflammation to the smallest airways making infants especially vulnerable sometimes resulting in hospitalization or ICU care. Other patients who need to avoid RSV are children with a history of prematurity, chronic lung disease, congenital heart disease, immunodeficiency or solid organ transplant.”

“As we see this concerning trend in high volumes of pediatric emergent care and hospitalizations, we need to all work together to protect our children and conserve resources.  Pediatric beds are a shared resource across the state,” stated Christine Nefcy, MD, chief medical officer, Munson Healthcare. “Many smaller community or rural hospitals in Michigan have minimal pediatric bed capacity and rely on other facilities for higher level or specialty care for these patients. At this time of year, we naturally want to gather more often with family and friends; so as you make plans, we urge parents to follow these guidelines to ensure we manage this surge using all the tools at hand.”

“We are urging Michiganders to have a plan for their families this respiratory season to help prevent hospital overcrowding and prevent outbreaks of respiratory illnesses using the tools available,” said Dr. Natasha Bagdasarian, the state’s chief medical executive. “This includes getting available vaccines, staying home if unwell, having a supply of masks at home, covering coughs, washing your hands often and finding out if you are eligible for treatment options if you do become unwell.”

The MHA and its pediatric clinical leaders and partners offer the following tips for the public:

  • DON’T: Seek hospital emergency care for non-emergency medical conditions, such as mild symptoms and routine testing.
  • DO: Seek hospital emergency care if symptoms are worrisome and emergency care is needed. Emergency medical conditions can include difficulty breathing, dehydration and worsening symptoms.
  • DO: Immediately get vaccinated against respiratory illnesses. Visit www.vaccines.gov to search for vaccine availability or call your provider or the local health department.
  • DO: Be patient if seeking care through a hospital emergency department. Consider that wait times may be elevated as respiratory illnesses reach seasonal peak levels.
  • DO: Consider having your children wear a mask in public places including school when you know local case rates of respiratory illnesses are high.
  • DO: Practice frequent and proper hand washing and stay home if you’re not feeling well.

Additional information: 

Influenza is a viral respiratory illness with symptoms that include fever, cough, stuffy or runny nose, sore throat, headache, chills and fatigue. A flu test is not always needed to diagnose the flu, however in some cases it may be recommended by a healthcare provider. People at risk of complications should consult their healthcare provider.

RSV infection is a viral respiratory illness that usually causes mild, cold-like symptoms. Most people recover in a week or two, but RSV can be serious, especially for infants and older adults. Symptoms include runny nose, decreased appetite, coughing, sneezing, fever and wheezing.

Reporters may contact the following representatives from the Pediatric Leadership Collaborative to schedule interviews:

Natasha Bagdasarian, MD, MPH, FIDSA, Chief Medical Executive, State of Michigan
Media Contact: Lynn Sutfin, SutfinL1@michigan.gov

Francis Darr, MD, Pediatrician, UP Health System – Marquette
Media Contact: Janell Larson, Janell.Larson@mghs.org

Marcus DeGraw, MD, Chairman, Department of Pediatrics, Ascension St. John Hospital St. John Children’s Center
Media Contact: Airielle Taylor, airielle.taylor@ascension.org

Matthew Denenberg, MD, Chief of Pediatrics, Corewell Health East
Media Contact: Mark Geary, mark.geary@beaumont.org

Michael Fiore, MD, Medical Director, Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Covenant Healthcare
Media Contact: Kristin Knoll, kknoll@chs-mi.com

Steven Martin, MD, E.W. Sparrow Hospital, Interim Chief Medical Officer & Co-Director of University of Michigan Health at Sparrow Children’s Center, Sparrow Health System
Media Contact: John Foren, John.Foren@Sparrow.org

Kimberly Monroe, MD, MS, Interim Chief Clinical Officer, C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital & Von Voigtlander Women’s Hospital
Media Contact: Beata Mostafavi, bmostafa@med.umich.edu

Christine Nefcy, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Munson Healthcare
Jacques Burgess, MD, MPH, System Pediatric Medical Director, Munson Healthcare
Media Contact: Dale Killingbeck, dkillingbeck@mhc.net

Brian M Nolan, MD, Hurley Children’s Hospital
Media Contact: Peggy Agar, pagar1@hurleymc.com

Dominic Sanfilippo, MD, Associate Department Chief / Pediatrician-in-Chief, Corewell Health Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital
Media Contact: Andrea Finnigan, Andrea.Finnigan@spectrumhealth.org

Uzma Shah MD, FAAP, FAASLD, Chair, Department of Pediatrics, Henry Ford Health
Media Contact: Dana Jay, djay2@hfhs.org

Gregory Tiongson, MD, Medical Director, Bronson Children’s Hospital
Media Contact: Erin Smith, smither@bronsonhg.org

Rudolph Valentini, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Children’s Hospital of Michigan
Media Contact: Brian Taylor, BTaylor8@dmc.org

Children’s Hospitals Issue Plea to Reduce Respiratory Illnesses

The following letter is published on behalf of the Michigan Children’s Hospital Clinical Leadership Collaborative.

As pediatric physician leaders who treat children and adolescents in our hospitals and clinics, we need your help. The number of children in Michigan infected and ill with COVID-19 and other respiratory viruses in Michigan is increasing. Our clinics, emergency departments and hospitals are reaching capacity.

Every day, 300 children under 10 years of age are infected with COVID-19 in Michigan. With more confirmed cases, we are seeing more children seeking care for COVID-19 symptoms, more children being hospitalized, and higher rates of children admitted to intensive care units since last month. When combined with extremely high rates of RSV among children for this time of year and more children seeking care in the emergency department with mental and behavioral health issues, the number of children needing care is surpassing our state’s staffing and resource capacity and straining our healthcare workforce at unprecedented levels.

We ask everyone in Michigan to do their part to reduce the incidence of COVID-19 and respiratory illness in our schools and communities and to protect our children by using the best tools we have.

  • Get vaccinated for COVID-19 as soon as possible if you are eligible and make sure your family is up to date on all other vaccinations, including the yearly flu shot.
  • Please wear a mask and encourage your children to do so, especially while at school and when attending large gatherings.
  • Please adhere to proven safe health practices of physical distancing and hand washing.

Together we can keep our children safer and maintain our ability to provide the highest level of care when they need it. They need each of us to do our part. They need us now.

With Appreciation,

Michigan Children’s Hospital Clinical Leadership Collaborative

Marcus DeGraw, MD
Chairman, Department of Pediatrics
Ascension St. John Children’s Hospital

Jeffery DeVries, MD
VP Graduate Medical Education
Beaumont Children’s Hospital

Gregory Tiongson, MD
Medical Director
Bronson Children’s Hospital

Rudolph Valentini, MD
Chief Medical Officer
Children’s Hospital of Michigan

Chris Dickinson, MD
Chief Clinical Officer
University of Michigan CS Mott Children’s Hospital

Matthew Denenberg, MD
VP Medical Affairs
Spectrum Health Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital

Michael Jaggi, DO
Chief Medical Officer
Hurley Children’s Hospital

Francis Darr, MD, FAAP
Chair of the Department of Pediatrics
Marquette General Hospital

Christine Nefcy, MD
Chief Medical Officer
Munson Medical Center

Aditi Sharangpani, MD
Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
Sparrow Health System