MHA Monday Report Oct. 17, 2022

MHA Monday Report

Legislative Policy Panel Convenes for Program Year

The MHA Legislative Policy Panel convened Oct. 12 to develop recommendations for the MHA Board of Trustees on legislative initiatives impacting Michigan hospitals …


MDHHS Releases Medicaid Rate Increase Policies

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) recently released two concurrent final and proposed policies to implement Medicaid rate increases included in the fiscal year (FY) 2023 budget for dates of service on and after Oct. 1, 2022 …


MHA Keystone Center Presents Annual Health Equity Summit

Registration is now open for the Michigan Health Equity Summit that will take place in-person at Lansing Community College West Campus and virtually from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET on Nov. 3 …


ED MOUD Funding Available – Applications Due Dec. 16

The Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan (CFSEM) is partnering with the MHA Keystone Center, the Michigan Opioid Partnership (MOP) and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) to provide …


Webinar Prepares for The Joint Commission and CMS Health Equity Requirements

Recently, The Joint Commission (TJC) and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) announced their commitment in driving the next decade of health equity for people who are underserved. The commitment to advancing health equity …


MHA Podcast Explores Program Year Priorities with Michigan Medicine

The MHA released another episode of the MiCare Champion Cast, which features interviews with healthcare policy experts in Michigan on key issues that impact healthcare and the health of communities …


MHA Race of the Week – Michigan Supreme Court

The MHA’s Race of the Week series highlights the most pivotal statewide races and ballot questions for Election 2022. The series will provide hospitals and healthcare advocates with the resources they need to make informed decisions on Election Day, including candidates’ views and background …


The Keckley Report

Paul KeckleyIs the Honeymoon Over for Medicare Advantage?

“The bottom line: in the next 2-3 years, regulatory scrutiny of Medicare Advantage will increase and funding by Medicare will decrease. Congress will press for a clear correlation between Medicare’s solvency and MA cost-savings. Thus, it’s likely Medicare Advantage plans will charge higher premiums, limit benefits, intensify medical management activities, share more financial risk with high-performing provider organizations and offer services to new populations. Their margins will shrink, access to capital and enrollment growth will be imperatives, and innovation in holistic cost-effective care management and affordability key differentiators.”

Paul Keckley, Oct. 10, 2022


Logo for MI Vote Matters, Tuesday Nov. 8News to Know

  • The last day to register online to vote in the Nov. 8 election is Oct. 24, 2022.
  • Early in-person voting by absentee ballot at a clerk’s office remains available.
  • Complimentary MI Vote Matters informational posters and the 2022 Candidate Guide are still available for MHA members.

Michigan Healthcare Leaders Speak on Clinical Genomics During White House Panel

MHA EVP Laura Appel joins experts from MDHHS, BCBSM, Michigan Medicine and Beaumont Health

The MHA and fellow healthcare leaders joined a virtual panel discussion on clinical genomics Sept. 22 hosted by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

The purpose of the webinar was to raise awareness about the clinical utility and lifesaving potential of clinical genome sequencing, as well as highlight coverage models for state Medicaid programs and private payors to help enable equitable access.

According to the National Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the National Institutes of Health, recent technological advances have made it possible for clinicians to quickly sequence the genomes of critically ill newborns and children to rapidly make a diagnosis. This powerful technology can transform lives by identifying potentially lifesaving and life-changing medical treatment. However, despite the enormous promise of genome sequencing to improve health outcomes, not all patients who might benefit from this technology can access it.

Laura Appel, executive vice president of Government Relations & Public Policy at the MHA, joined the conversation to speak on our state’s model for advancing coverage of genomic sequencing. Other panelists from Michigan healthcare institutions, included:

  • Brian Keisling, director of bureau of Medicaid policy at the Michigan Department of Health & Human Services.
  • Caleb Bupp, M.D., FACMG, division chief of medical genetics & genomics at Beaumont Health Spectrum Health and Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital.
  • Lynne Carter, M.D., MPH, medical director at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan.
  • Wendy R. Uhlmann, M.S., LCGC, genetic counselor and clinical professor at the Departments of Internal Medicine (Division of Genetic Medicine) and Human Genetics at the University of Michigan.

During the discussion, the group touched on Project Baby Deer, an initiative that provides rapid whole genome sequencing testing for critically ill infants up to one year of age. The program can enhance clinical management of young patients by initiating life-saving treatments, avoiding unnecessary tests and procedures, shortening hospital stays and helping families with treatment decision-making.

To learn more about clinical genome sequencing, visit the HHS website. Those with questions about Project Baby Deer may contact Laura Appel at the MHA.

Michigan Hospitals Invested $4.2 Billion in Community Programming Mid-pandemic to Improve Health, Well-being of Residents

New report outlines hospital community health efforts in FY 2020

The Michigan Health & Hospital Association (MHA) released today the Healthy Futures, Healthy Communities report that demonstrates a nearly $4.2 billion investment in community-based partnerships and programming in fiscal year (FY) 2020. Overall, hospitals invested more than $869 million in community and voluntary-based activities, from education and prevention services to community outreach, research and workforce development.

Data in the report shows investments made throughout the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, demonstrating Michigan’s hospitals and health systems continued offering a wide range of services and resources to their communities inside and outside of the traditional healthcare setting that improved the overall health, wellness and quality of life of residents.

“Even through some of the most challenging times in healthcare, hospitals and health systems haven’t wavered in their commitment to helping improve the overall health and wellness of the communities they serve,” said MHA CEO Brian Peters. “This report gives a clear and simple message: The impact of our healthcare workforce reaches far beyond the walls of patient rooms.”

In addition to community benefit services and programs, the report also highlights the contributions of hospitals when it comes to uncompensated care. In FY 2020, the unpaid costs of patient care at Michigan hospitals totaled more than $3.4 billion, which includes both financial assistance and bad debt at cost, as well as Medicaid and Medicare payment shortfalls, other means-tested government programs and subsidized health services.

“The programs​ and services that ​hospitals and health systems provide ​have ​a long-term and positive impact on community health,” said T. Anthony Denton, J.D., MHSA, senior vice president and chief operating officer of University of Michigan Hospitals, Health Centers and Medical Group and 2022-2023 Chair of the MHA Board of Trustees. “Patients and communities bec​ame more intertwined ​than ever as ​healthcare teams worked to provide care, compassion, financial and in-kind resources and knowledge throughout the COVID-19 pandemic and continue to do so. Our role as anchor institutions ​is and has always been vital, providing an important uplift to those in need by way of various contributions which demonstrate our value as a major community asset. Through our many efforts, we are privileged to build bridges and connect communities to inform, elevate and empower individuals and families to mitigate social determinants and advance health, inspire hope and foster meaningful presence.”

Included in the report are examples of programs implemented by hospitals throughout Michigan that expand access to care and improve the health of vulnerable populations within their communities.

“McLaren, as a large health system, serves large urban settings and smaller rural communities, and the critical charge of being a community-integrated provider is having a sound, community-based system of care in place,” said Dr. Justin Klamerus, McLaren Health Care chief medical officer. “Increasingly, health care is moving toward care that existed outside of the hospital, both in treatment and preventive practices. It’s part of our responsibility to attune ourselves to the needs of our communities, especially in critical access areas, and doubly so during a time when many may still be hesitant to seek care in a hospital setting. Our facilities in Bay, Caro and the Thumb Region are true in the commitment to their communities and are really working to meet their needs.”

The full report and stories from hospitals across the state that exhibiting community benefit can be accessed online here.

Implicit Bias Trainings Available to Meet LARA Requirement

The Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA) revised Public Health Code Rules requiring implicit bias training for all professions licensed or registered under the Public Health Code took effect in June. Implicit Bias trainings are still available for those needing to meet the requirement.

The Office for Health Equity and Inclusion at Michigan Medicine is hosting a 1-hour, live virtual course called Building Toward Belonging: Implicit Bias Training (LARA Compliant) for $150 per participant. The following groups qualify for a $50 per person discount:

  • University of Michigan alumni and retirees.
  • Non-profit workers.
  • K-12 workers.
  • Groups of 10+ (must be registered together).

Those who fall within one of the above categories can contact the team to request a promo code. For teams of 50 or more, a request can be made at least 6-8 weeks in advance for scheduling a virtual session outside of the posted dates.

The Michigan Health Council is also offering implicit bias trainings in two formats, hybrid or live guest lecture, over the next several months. In a hybrid delivery model, learners will watch a one-hour video on demand and attend a one-hour webinar to engage in a robust discussion and group exercises. Registration for this training is available for $50 per person.

With a guest presentation, organizations can offer the training to staff onsite at their convenience. The presentation will include an introduction to implicit bias followed by targeted exercises, discussion and evaluation questions. Members may contact Kristin Sewell for pricing and availability.

Implicit Bias Trainings Available to Meet LARA Requirement

The Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA) revised Public Health Code Rules requiring implicit bias training for all professions licensed or registered under the Public Health Code took effect in June. Implicit Bias trainings are still available for those needing to meet the requirement.

The Office for Health Equity and Inclusion – Michigan Medicine is hosting Building Toward Belonging: Implicit Bias Training (LARA Compliant), a 1-hour, live virtual course.

Building Toward Belonging: Implicit Bias Training is being offered for $150 per participant.

The following groups qualify for a $50 per person discount:

  • University of Michigan alumni and retirees
  • Non-profit workers
  • K-12 workers
  • Groups of 10+ (must be registered together)

If you fall within one of these categories, send an email to OHEI-training@med.umich.edu and request a promo code for the category you qualify for.

Community Group Session Rates: If your team has 50 or more participants, you can request a virtual session outside of our currently posted schedule. This session would be scheduled for a time that works for your team and requests must be submitted in this form at least 6-8 weeks in advance.

The Michigan Health Council is also offering implicit bias trainings in two formats, hybrid or live guest lecture, over the next several months.

In a hybrid delivery model, learners will watch a one-hour video on demand and attend a one-hour webinar to engage in a robust discussion and group exercises with the instructor and other learners. This training is available for $50 per person. Register here.

With a guest presentation, organizations can offer the training to their staff on-site at their convenience. The presentation will include an introduction to implicit bias and targeted exercises, discussion, and evaluation questions. Members may contact Kristin Sewell via email or at 517-908-8243 for pricing and availability.

Combating the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19): Week of Feb. 28

MHA Covid-19 update

MHA Covid-19 updateThe state of Michigan reported that 1,842 new cases of COVID-19 were confirmed statewide March 3 and 4, with an average of 921 cases per day. Out of 68 recorded COVID-19-related deaths for the two days, 54 were identified during a Vital Records review. Adults in the hospital March 4 with confirmed cases of COVID-19 numbered 865, along with 27 children. This is a significant drop from early January, when more than 4,000 Michiganders were hospitalized with the disease.

The MHA continues to keep members apprised of pandemic-related developments affecting hospitals through email updates and the MHA Coronavirus webpage. Important updates are outlined below.

Webinar Recap: Navigating Paxlovid and Drug-Drug Interactions

The MHA recently hosted a webinar in partnership with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) and Michigan Medicine to provide information regarding Pfizer’s Paxlovid (nirmatrelvir tablets and ritonavir tablets, co-packaged for oral use) and drug-drug interactions. Paxlovid has been authorized by the Food and Drug Administration for emergency use for the treatment of mild to moderate COVID-19 in adults and children (12 years of age and older, weighing at least 88 pounds). Paxlovid is available by prescription only and should be initiated as soon as possible after diagnosis of COVID-19 and within five days of symptom onset. A Paxlovid drug-drug interaction summary will be updated by Michigan Medicine as more information becomes available.

The MDHHS confirmed Paxlovid is available at all Meijer pharmacies and encouraged providers to prescribe Paxlovid to eligible patients as soon as possible. Meijer pharmacies were selected due to market coverage and the ability to conduct home deliveries for patients unable to travel. As relative supply of oral antivirals increases and demand remains low, the MDHHS anticipates expanding to additional dispensing sites soon. Facilities interested in making this available through outpatient pharmacies should check with the MDHHS. Members with questions regarding Paxlovid drug-drug interactions should contact Nicholas Dillman, PharmD, at Michigan Medicine. Other questions can be directed to Renée Smiddy at the MHA.

Additional information on the COVID-19 pandemic is available to members on the MHA Community Site and the MHA COVID-19 webpage. Questions on COVID-19 and infectious disease response strategies may be directed to the MDHHS Community Health Emergency Coordination Center (CHECC).