MHA Monday Report Oct. 3, 2022

MHA Monday Report

capitol buildingEconomic Development Supplemental Passed by Michigan Legislature

The Michigan Legislature was back in session the week of Sept. 26 to finish voting on a multitude of bills as committees and the full body met for the last time before the Nov. 8 election …


Workforce Funding ReportMHA Distributes Workforce Grant Report to Legislature

Based on requirements in legislative boilerplate, the MHA created and distributed to the Michigan Legislature Sept. 28 a report on the results of the state healthcare workforce grant, which brought $225 million to Michigan hospitals for workforce recruitment, retention and training …


MDHHS Releases Proposed Policy for Attending Physician Claims

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) released a proposed policy to update existing policy for the attending provider field on institutional hospital inpatient and outpatient claims …


MHA Keystone Center Presents Annual Health Equity Summit

Registration is now open for the Michigan Health Equity Summit that will take place in-person at Lansing Community College West Campus and virtually from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET on Nov. 3.


Trustee Member Forum Outlines Membership Strategies

The MHA will host a Trustee Member Forum from noon to 4:30 p.m. Nov. 2 at the MHA Headquarters in Okemos for trustees from MHA member organizations to explore the MHA’s 2022-2023 program year’s strategic action plan, which the MHA Board of Trustees approved in August …


Revised Doula Services Policy Released by MDHHS

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services recently released a second proposed policy to establish coverage for doula services effective Jan. 1, 2023. The MHA supports this proposal and agrees with the MDHHS statement that the policy will improve birth outcomes …


Webinar Highlights Diverse Perspectives and Collaboration to Improve Strategic Goals

Now is the time to maximize board resources to design healthcare that is affordable, equitable and focused on your community’s needs. To effectively create strategies, an organization’s leadership must agree on the approach, terminology and …


MHA Race of the Week – Michigan Governor

The MHA’s Race of the Week series highlights the most pivotal statewide races and ballot questions for Election 2022. The series will provide hospitals and healthcare advocates with the resources they need to make informed decisions on Election Day, including candidates’ views and background …


MHA Rounds Report - Brian Peters, MHA CEOMHA CEO Report — Michigan Hospitals: Benefitting Communities in Significant Ways

Fall is officially upon us. At the MHA, that means a new program year is well underway, we have a new Strategic Action Plan in place and are preparing for the November election which is now just weeks away…


Paul KeckleyThe Keckley Report

The Winners and Losers in US Healthcare Thru 2025: What to Expect

“With 6 weeks to the mid-term election, one thing is certain: healthcare issues will be prominent in campaign rhetoric but the reality is not much will change until after 2024. Economic conditions, Congressional dysfunction and effective advocacy efforts by trade groups representing hospitals, drug and device manufacturers, and health insurers will limit major reforms… ”

Paul Keckley, Sept. 26, 2022


Logo for MI Vote Matters, Tuesday Nov. 8News to Know

  • As Election Day nears, the Citizens Research Council of Michigan is hosting a free webinar from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Oct. 5 on the three proposed constitutional amendments that will appear on the Nov. 8 ballot.

Laura Appel speaks with WILX.

MHA in the News

Below is a collection of headlines from around the state that include interviews or statements from MHA representatives.

MHA CEO Report — Michigan Hospitals: Benefitting Communities in Significant Ways

MHA Rounds Report - Brian Peters, MHA CEO

Life’s most persistent and urgent question is, ‘What are you doing for others?”  Martin Luther King, Jr.

MHA Rounds Report - Brian Peters, MHA CEOFall is officially upon us. At the MHA, that means a new program year is well underway, we have a new Strategic Action Plan in place and are preparing for the November election which is now just weeks away. This fall, we are also very proud to continue an annual tradition and publish two new reports documenting the critical role of our membership throughout the state: the 2022 Economic Impact of Healthcare in Michigan and the Healthy Futures, Health Communities community benefit report.

Fiscal year 2020 data (the most recently available) is shared in each report and it reinforces the position that hospitals are both economic drivers and community leaders. Healthcare remains the largest private sector employer in Michigan with nearly 572,000 total individuals directly employed, 224,000 of which are in hospitals. These direct healthcare workers earned $44.2 billion in wages, salaries and benefits and when combined with indirect, healthcare-supported jobs, contributed almost $15.2 billion in local, state and federal taxes. Hospitals provide mission-oriented work aimed at the health and wellness of their patients and communities, but the data is clear that hospitals clearly have a role in the economic health of our state as well.

We take our work towards improving community wellness seriously, which is demonstrated by the nearly $4.2 billion investment in community-based partnerships and programming. Hospitals invested more than $869 million in community and voluntary-based activities while providing $3.4 billion in uncompensated care. Hospitals are committed to not only caring for anyone who walks through their doors, but towards preventative care programs that can help reduce the need of inpatient hospital services. The costs of these efforts come directly out of a hospital’s bottom line but are vital towards ensuring vulnerable patients have the ability to receive needed care.

These reports are based on data from the first year of the pandemic. I do not have to tell you how trying and difficult those times were for hospitals. Despite the uncertainty and demand on hospitals and health systems during that time, they continued to support our communities in these important ways. Our healthcare system was stretched to new lengths, but we had over half a million individuals directly involved in providing care to patients. With a statewide population of 10 million, 40% of which are either under the age of 18 or aged 65 and older, healthcare either directly or indirectly employs over 18% of our workforce.

Yet the 2020 numbers also begin to provide evidence of the loss of healthcare workers that we anecdotally have shared for the last several years. For the first time in the history of the economic impact report, total direct jobs in Michigan from healthcare declined, including the loss of 7,000 jobs in hospitals. Despite those losses, total compensation for hospital workers remained the same, as contracted labor (e.g. those working for nurse staffing agencies) became a necessity for hospitals to maintain appropriate staffing levels.

But I do not want to lose sight of what the headline should be, and that is healthcare remains an economic engine and the largest private-sector employer in Michigan. At a time where every industry is struggling with having enough staff, healthcare remains a very significant employer. And the industry holds a tremendous amount of opportunity for new job growth moving forward: Michigan’s recent list of the top career fields with the highest projected growth is dominated by healthcare professions. Hospitals not only offer well-compensated careers with strong benefits, but in a rewarding field that truly makes a difference in the lives of our neighbors. Hospital careers also exist in communities large and small, helping to keep college graduates and young professionals in our state. Lastly, the skills of a healthcare professional are transferrable, regardless of region, and long-lasting. The training and education for a healthcare professional today will remain relevant over the next several decades.

Every year that goes by, hospitals seek to be more involved with individuals outside the walls of their facilities. They are helping to address the social determinants of health, including access to transportation and food insecurity. And they are intertwined in not only the individual health of community members, but in the success of local business and municipalities. Access to healthcare is at the top of any organization’s checklist wishing to expand their footprint into new markets. Our success depends on the success of community leaders and vice versa.

When we advocate for much-needed Medicaid and Medicare funding, for the 340B drug pricing program and for good health policy at the state and federal level, we do so because we know these are essential to maintaining access to quality healthcare in communities throughout Michigan. With the facts presented by our new reports on economic impact and community benefit, we believe there is more reason than ever for our elected officials – and all of us – to support our Michigan hospitals.

As always, I welcome your thoughts.

Headline Roundup: Week of Sept. 25, 2022

Laura Appel speaks with WILX.
Laura Appel speaks with WILX.
MHA EVP Laura Appel speaks with WILX News 10.

Below is a collection of headlines from around the state that include interviews or statements from MHA representatives.

Thursday, Sept. 29

Wednesday, Sept. 28

Tuesday, Sept. 27

Monday, Sept. 26

Sunday, Sept. 25

Members with any questions regarding media requests should contact John Karasinski at the MHA.

MHA Monday Report Sept. 26, 2022

MHA Monday Report

Michigan Hospitals Invested $4.2 Billion in Community Programming Mid-pandemic


Legislature Returns to Continue Healthcare-related Work


MHA Hosts Valuable Advocacy Events


MHA Launches Physician Membership with AAPL Partnership

The MHA and the American Association for Physician Leadership (AAPL) announced a partnership Sept. 22 that will provide leadership education and training to MHA physician members. The announcement expands the range of benefits offered through …


Michigan Healthcare Leaders Speak on Clinical Genomics During White House Panel


Webinar Highlights Discipline Required to Accomplish Strategic Goals

Now is the time to maximize board resources to design healthcare that is affordable, equitable and focused on your community’s needs. To effectively create strategies, an organization’s leadership must agree on the approach, terminology and …


Suicide Prevention Focus of AHA Trustee Insights

September is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month and an opportunity to be reminded of the many resources available to support emotional well-being. The September edition of Trustee Insights, the monthly digital package from the American Hospital …


The Keckley Report

The two changes most likely in the value agenda of the U.S health system

“This week, the celebration of Queen Elizabeth’s life will take center stage leading up to her funeralPaul Keckley September 19. The 96-year old’s longevity, the mystique of the monarchy and Britain’s oversized role in Western culture will be table talk. …

The structure of the UK and US health systems are different. Per the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the health system in the US is more expensive, more fragmented and less effective in optimizing the population’s health than the [National Health Service] and many other developed systems. Several factors explain the difference: social determinants, violence, unit prices paid for drugs, specialty care and hospitals in the U.S. and others.”

Paul Keckley, Sept. 19, 2022


News to KnowLogo for MI Vote Matters, Tuesday Nov. 8

As Election Day nears, the MHA continues to offer complimentary MI Vote Matters informational posters and the 2022 Candidate Guide for members’ use in encouraging their communities to vote.


MHA in the News
Brian Peters

The MHA received media coverage on several topics during the week of Sept. 12. Areas of focus included the Economic Impact of Healthcare in Michigan report and the new national rural emergency hospital (REH) designation. …

Michigan Hospitals Invested $4.2 Billion in Community Programming Mid-pandemic to Improve Health, Well-being of Residents

New report outlines hospital community health efforts in FY 2020

The Michigan Health & Hospital Association (MHA) released today the Healthy Futures, Healthy Communities report that demonstrates a nearly $4.2 billion investment in community-based partnerships and programming in fiscal year (FY) 2020. Overall, hospitals invested more than $869 million in community and voluntary-based activities, from education and prevention services to community outreach, research and workforce development.

Data in the report shows investments made throughout the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, demonstrating Michigan’s hospitals and health systems continued offering a wide range of services and resources to their communities inside and outside of the traditional healthcare setting that improved the overall health, wellness and quality of life of residents.

“Even through some of the most challenging times in healthcare, hospitals and health systems haven’t wavered in their commitment to helping improve the overall health and wellness of the communities they serve,” said MHA CEO Brian Peters. “This report gives a clear and simple message: The impact of our healthcare workforce reaches far beyond the walls of patient rooms.”

In addition to community benefit services and programs, the report also highlights the contributions of hospitals when it comes to uncompensated care. In FY 2020, the unpaid costs of patient care at Michigan hospitals totaled more than $3.4 billion, which includes both financial assistance and bad debt at cost, as well as Medicaid and Medicare payment shortfalls, other means-tested government programs and subsidized health services.

“The programs​ and services that ​hospitals and health systems provide ​have ​a long-term and positive impact on community health,” said T. Anthony Denton, J.D., MHSA, senior vice president and chief operating officer of University of Michigan Hospitals, Health Centers and Medical Group and 2022-2023 Chair of the MHA Board of Trustees. “Patients and communities bec​ame more intertwined ​than ever as ​healthcare teams worked to provide care, compassion, financial and in-kind resources and knowledge throughout the COVID-19 pandemic and continue to do so. Our role as anchor institutions ​is and has always been vital, providing an important uplift to those in need by way of various contributions which demonstrate our value as a major community asset. Through our many efforts, we are privileged to build bridges and connect communities to inform, elevate and empower individuals and families to mitigate social determinants and advance health, inspire hope and foster meaningful presence.”

Included in the report are examples of programs implemented by hospitals throughout Michigan that expand access to care and improve the health of vulnerable populations within their communities.

“McLaren, as a large health system, serves large urban settings and smaller rural communities, and the critical charge of being a community-integrated provider is having a sound, community-based system of care in place,” said Dr. Justin Klamerus, McLaren Health Care chief medical officer. “Increasingly, health care is moving toward care that existed outside of the hospital, both in treatment and preventive practices. It’s part of our responsibility to attune ourselves to the needs of our communities, especially in critical access areas, and doubly so during a time when many may still be hesitant to seek care in a hospital setting. Our facilities in Bay, Caro and the Thumb Region are true in the commitment to their communities and are really working to meet their needs.”

The full report and stories from hospitals across the state that exhibiting community benefit can be accessed online here.