MHA Ludwig Community Benefit Award

In tribute to the legacy of leadership and community partnership demonstrated by Patric E. Ludwig, former MHA president and Bronson Healthcare Group president, the Michigan Health & Hospital Association presents the Ludwig Community Benefit Award to member organizations that have aided their communities in extraordinary ways. The award is presented annually to healthcare organizations that demonstrate community benefit by improving the health and well-being of their communities through healthcare, economic or social initiatives. The award criteria strongly emphasize outcomes that impact the welfare of the communities the programs serve. The 100-point system used to rate the nominated programs has been weighted to reflect this emphasis.

Nomination Deadline: Feb. 17, 2017
Award Presentation: June 29, 2017

The Legacy of Patric E. Ludwig

The MHA "Ludwig Community Benefit Award" was named in honor of Patric E. Ludwig, a man of vision, commitment and compassion who died suddenly in 1996 at the age of 57. Ludwig served as MHA president from 1974 to 1985 and as president of Bronson Health Group, Kalamazoo, from 1985 until his untimely death. Both terms of leadership were marked by exponential growth and dramatic accomplishment. Former American Hospital Association President Dick Davidson said, "Pat kept community need at the heart of all he did. His vision of leadership in the healthcare field was simple. It was defined by results — that meant better healthcare for everyone."

Nomination Criteria

Programs will be judged on the following criteria, based on a 100-point system:

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM AND GOAL (5 PTS.):

  • State the specific health need or problem that was addressed and the short- and long-term goals of the program designed to resolve it
  • Briefly outline the steps taken to reach those goals.

LEADERSHIP ROLE (20 PTS.):

  • Describe leadership actions taken by the nominee to ensure the problem was approached on a communitywide basis. 
  • Provide highlights of any collaborative efforts with other healthcare providers, community agencies or other organizations to evaluate the problem and address it properly.

MISSON AND VISION ROLE (10 PTS.):

  • Explain how the nominated program supports the MHA's mission/vision to advance the health of individuals and communities by achieving better care for individuals, better health for populations and lower per-capita costs.

PROGRAM DESIGN AND OUTCOMES (35 PTS.):

  • Explain the steps taken to solve the problem.
  • Describe the program’s demonstrated and measurable impact on the community’s health and well-being, including its outcomes for each stakeholder (i.e., patients, their families, staff, the community, payers, businesses, health profession students, suppliers/partners, etc.) and the number of residents impacted.
  • Indicate the program's annual budget.

ASSESSMENT (20 PTS.):

  • Outline the strategy used to assess the program’s effectiveness since its implementation.
  • Summarize plans for the program’s future, including those for measuring its continuing impact on the community and other stakeholders.

SUSTAINABILITY (10 PTS.):

  • Describe the origin of the organization’s commitment, what has sustained that commitment, and how it will be maintained in the future.
  • Outline how the award will be used to enhance the program, should the organization win the award.

Eligibility

Any Type I A-D or Type II A-C MHA member in good standing may submit a nomination for the Ludwig Community Benefit Award. To allow for adequate assessment of its outcomes for the community, each program nominated for the award must have been in effect since at least January the previous year. The MHA also welcomes the nomination of longstanding programs and encourages resubmission of previous nonwinning nominees that are still active.

Entry Requirements

To ensure efficient processing of nomination materials, all entries must include:

  • The nomination form.
  • An overview of no more than 275 words that summarizes the program’s basic structure and outcomes. This section must describe the program and the problem it addresses; the essential elements of the strategy for implementing the program; and a brief summary of the program’s outcomes.
  •  No more than five additional double-spaced pages (approximately 1,500 words) that address the six criteria listed in the “Criteria” section. These pages should be organized under the subheads — statement of problem and goal, leadership role, mission and vision role, program design and outcomes, assessment, and sustainability — that correspond to each of the items in the “Criteria” section and must be separate from the overview described above.

Please note:

  • No additional supplementary materials will be reviewed.
  • The “Nomination Deadlines and Submission” section should be reviewed before submission.

Any program nominated for the Ludwig Community Benefit Award may be featured in various MHA materials to demonstrate how hospitals benefit their communities. Submission of a nomination indicates approval for the MHA to use the nomination materials in its publications and advocacy efforts.

Award Winners

2016

  • Beaumont Hospital, Taylor - School of Wellness Program at Harry S. Truman High School
  • Bronson Battle Creek - Operation Fit
  • Hayes Green Beach Memorial Hospital, Charlotte - Al!ve

2015

  • Aspirus Grand View, Ironwood — Community Mass Immunization Clinic
  • Charlevoix Area Hospital — Charlevoix Area Hospital School Nurse Program
  • Community Health Center of Branch County, Coldwater — School Tele-health Program
  • Spectrum Health Zeeland Community Hospital — Communitywide Harmonica Program

2014

  • Alpena Regional Medical Center — Alpena Cancer Center
  • Oakwood Healthcare, Dearborn — Coordinated Approach to Child Health (CATCH) Kids Club
  • Spectrum Health Gerber Memorial, Fremont — Tamarac, The Center for Health and Well-being
  • War Memorial Hospital, Sault Ste. Marie — Road to Recovery

2013

  • Borgess Health, Kalamazoo – Borgess Tree of Love
  • Chelsea Community Hospital – SRSLY
  • Munson Healthcare, Traverse City – Northern Michigan Diabetes Initiative
  • ProMedica, Toledo, OH – Come to the Table

2012

  • Harbor Beach Community Hospital – Harbor Beach School Wellness Program
  • Metro Health, Wyoming – Metro Care
  • Sparrow Clinton Hospital, St. Johns – Childhood Obesity Prevention Initiative
  • University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor – Hope@UMHS

2011

  • Allegiance Health, Jackson – Jackson Prenatal Task Force Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak – Student Athlete Screening: Healthy Heart Check
  • Chelsea Community Hospital – Healthy Communities Walking Program
  • Memorial Healthcare, Owosso – Shiawassee Community Health Center

2010

  • Borgess Health, Kalamazoo – Borgess Diabetes Center
  • Mercy Health Partners, Muskegon – Pharmaceutical Access Program
  • Sparrow Hospital, Lansing – Fit Kids
  • Spectrum Health, Grand Rapids – Commit To Be Fit Wellness Program

2009

  • Lakeland HealthCare, St. Joseph — Senior Center RN Prescription Assistance Program
  • Oakwood Healthcare, Inc., Dearborn — CHildhood Asthma Management Program (CHAMP)

2008

  • Henry Ford Health System, Detroit — School-Based and Community Health Program
  • MidMichigan Medical Center - Midland — Smile, Reach, Speech Stroke Campaign

2007

  • North Central Council of the MHA, Petoskey — Let’s Get Moving, Northern Michigan
  • Memorial Healthcare, Owosso — Memorial FIT Kids

2006

  • Oakwood Healthcare System, Dearborn — Taylor Teen Health Center Summer Arts Academy

2005

  • Oakwood Healthcare System, Dearborn — Lincoln/Jefferson-Barnes Healthcare Center
  • Hurley Medical Center, Flint — Pediatric Asthma Disease Management

2004

  • Genesys Health System, Flint — Health Access
  • Ingham Regional Medical Center, Lansing — PATCH (Preventive Approach To Cardiac Health) Goes to School
  • St. John Health, Warren — Access to Care

2003

  • Mercy Health Services North-Mercy Hospital Cadillac — Cadillac Area Community Health Clinic
  • Oakwood Healthcare System — Program for Exceptional Families
  • Spectrum Health, Grand Rapids — Programa de Apoyo a Nuestra Comunidad (Helping Our Communities Program)

2002

  • Garden City Hospital — Community Youth Depression Project
  • MidMichigan Medical Center, Midland — Neighborhood Clinic
  • Port Huron Hospital — Thumbs up for Helmets (Helmet Safety Program)

2001

  • Holland Community Hospital — Project LIFT (Lifestyle Improvement For our Town)
  • Northern Michigan Hospital, Petoskey — Children’s Health Screening Program
  • Oakwood Healthcare System, Dearborn — Domestic Violence Initiative
  • Sparrow Health System, Lansing — Greater Lansing Health Education Collaborative

2000

  • Ingham Regional Medical Center, Lansing — Ingham Health Plan
  • Mercy Hospital, Port Huron — People’s Clinic for Better Health
  • St. Joseph Mercy of Macomb, Clinton Township — School Health Network

1999

  • Memorial Medical Center of West Michigan, Ludington — Mason County Mammography Task Force
  • Northern Michigan Hospital/Healthshare Group, Petoskey — Community Free Clinic
  • Oakwood Healthcare System, Dearborn — Community Assessment Project
  • Spectrum Health, Grand Rapids — Health Advocacy Program

1998

  • Detroit Riverview Hospital — Seniors Services
  • Holland Community Hospital — Community Health Center
  • Providence Hospital and Medical Centers, Southfield — Partners in Prevention
  • William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak — Parenting Program
  • William Beaumont Hospital, Troy — Newton Elementary School Health Center and Playground Project

1997

  • Bay Medical Center, Bay City — Prenatal Program and Clinic
  • The Detroit Medical Center/Detroit Receiving Hospital and University Health Center — Frostbite Prevention Program
  • St. Joseph Mercy - Oakland, Pontiac — Healthy Start for Oakland County
  • St. Mary’s Medical Center, Saginaw — Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program
  • Visiting Nurse Association of Southeast Michigan, Oak Park — Flu Buster Immunization Campaign

1996

  • Butterworth Hospital, Grand Rapids — Mothers Offering Mothers Support (MOMS) Program
  • Oaklawn Hospital, Marshall — School Nurse Program
  • Oakwood Healthcare System, Dearborn — Baby Track Program
  • OmniCare Health Plan, Detroit — Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) Outreach Program

1995

  • Hutzel Hospital, Detroit — Family Road Program
  • McLaren Regional Medical Center, Flint — Child Evaluation Clinic
  • Mercy Health Services North, Cadillac — Parish Nurse Program
  • St. John Health System, Detroit — Parish Nurse Program

1994

  • Bronson Methodist Hospital, Kalamazoo — HealthConnect
  • Borgess Medical Center, Kalamazoo — HealthConnect
  • Portage View Hospital, Hancock — Senior Meals Program
  • Leelanau Memorial Hospital, Northport — Well Child Clinic
  • Genesys Health System, Flint — Healthy Students 2000 Initiative

1993

  • William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak — Communication Station
  • Bon Secours Healthcare System, Grosse Pointe — Center for Good Help
  • Blodgett Memorial Medical Center, Grand Rapids — Cherry Street Health Services
  • Butterworth/Metropolitan Health Service, Grand Rapids — Cherry Street Health Services
  • St. Mary’s Hospital, Grand Rapids — Cherry Street Health Services

1992

  • W.A. Foote Hospital, Jackson — Center for Healthy Beginnings
  • Grand View Hospital, Ironwood — Seat
  • Henry Ford Health System, Detroit — Maplegrove Children’s Program
  • Mercy Hospital, Port Huron — The People’s Clinic for Better Health

1991

  • Muskegon General Hospital — Community Benefits Program
  • Riverside Osteopathic Hospital, Trenton — Food for Seniors
  • Samaritan Health Center, Detroit — Churches Intervention Project

1990

  • Mercy Hospital of Graying — River House Shelter

Nomination Form

2017 MHA Ludwig Community Benefit Award brochure

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